Back on Ti - Lynskey Helix

Who are you (no off-topic talk please)

Moderator: Moderator Team

Post Reply
RichTheRoadie
Tinker, Taylor, Tart
Posts: 2079
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Aus.

by RichTheRoadie

Sent myself down a rabbit hole with a line of enquiry after I sold my Klein - I'm now the proud owner of this Helix:

Image

Build list as follows:

Lysnkey Sport ML frame
(forget what brand fork)
Lynskey inline seatpost
Fizik K:1 saddle
Fizik R1 stem (painted to match the fork)
THM Ulna bar, 40cm
Fabric 'Knurl' bar tape
Full Campagnolo Super Record 12-speed mechanical groupset
Arundel Mandible cages
Fulcrum Racing Speed 40c clinchers (with Ceramic Speed ceramic bearing upgrade)
Fulcrum skewers
Michelin Power Endurance 28c tyres (currently)
Dura-Ace pedals (forget if these are 7900 or 9000 series)

Weight is 7.8kg with pedals.

Typically for me there's build refinements to come (Ti seatpost clamp, better headset setup, better tyres) and I'm not sure about the fork & stem combo (had to borrow the forks off another bike to get this together and figured I might as well use the stem too), but it's a quietly impressive and very well behaved bike.

Well, aside from that seatpost head, that is. 8Nm my arse. Currently I'm just tightening it as much as I can and keeping my fingers crossed that nothing breaks...!

welchy
Posts: 279
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 4:04 pm

by welchy

Chuffing lovely! Good weight for a Ti Lynskey. How do you find the 12spd?

EDIT: is it an issue with the Enve clamp as I have spare clamps I could send on if you paid a minimal amount more than postage.

by Weenie


Catagory6
Posts: 399
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:36 am

by Catagory6

what's going on with the top- and down-tubes?

welchy
Posts: 279
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 4:04 pm

by welchy

Catagory6 wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 8:30 pm
what's going on with the top- and down-tubes?
Name of the bike may give it away chum :thumbup:

guyc
Posts: 1002
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 9:40 am
Location: Hampshire, England
Contact:

by guyc

I like the contrast of the forks/stem. Def suits straight forks.

Has the Domane gone? I thought you loved that.

RichTheRoadie
Tinker, Taylor, Tart
Posts: 2079
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Aus.

by RichTheRoadie

welchy wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:29 pm
Chuffing lovely! Good weight for a Ti Lynskey. How do you find the 12spd?

EDIT: is it an issue with the Enve clamp as I have spare clamps I could send on if you paid a minimal amount more than postage.
Been on the 12spd for about a year now - it’s awesome.

Thanks for the offer on the Enve seatpost parts. I’ve learnt that Enve changed their torque settings for this older style of their seatpost head, so hopefully following that higher value (10-11Nm) will sort it.

RichTheRoadie
Tinker, Taylor, Tart
Posts: 2079
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Aus.

by RichTheRoadie

Catagory6 wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 8:30 pm
what's going on with the top- and down-tubes?
They’re twisted.

Lynskey claim this allows them to use the lighter 3/2.5 Ti tubes but maintain the stiffness of 6/4 Ti.

I can’t confirm or deny, but this certainly isn’t as ‘soft’ as Ti bikes have a reputation for.

fxx
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2010 2:10 pm

by fxx

RichTheRoadie wrote:
Catagory6 wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 8:30 pm
what's going on with the top- and down-tubes?
They’re twisted.

Lynskey claim this allows them to use the lighter 3/2.5 Ti tubes but maintain the stiffness of 6/4 Ti.

I can’t confirm or deny, but this certainly isn’t as ‘soft’ as Ti bikes have a reputation for.
I thought 6/4 was lighter and stiffer, just harder to work with and more expensive.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk


User avatar
pdlpsher1
Posts: 2424
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

6/4 has identical density and modulus as 3/2.5. 6/4 does have more tensile strength but let’s not confuse tensile strength with stiffness.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

fxx
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2010 2:10 pm

by fxx

pdlpsher1 wrote:6/4 has identical density and modulus as 3/2.5. 6/4 does have more tensile strength but let’s not confuse tensile strength with stiffness.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
You may be right, but since it is stronger it can be made stiffer with less material, hence lighter.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk


User avatar
pdlpsher1
Posts: 2424
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

Unfortunately 6/4 cannot be drawn into a tube easily and get butted. So it cannot be made very thin since you cannot weld a very thin tube. Hence 6/4 has no mechanical advantages over 3/2.5 despite the marketing hype on 6/4 for bikes. But 6/4 is used on all machined bits like dropouts and brake bridges because they are easier to machine than 3/2.5.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

fxx
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2010 2:10 pm

by fxx

pdlpsher1 wrote:Unfortunately 6/4 cannot be drawn into a tube easily and get butted. So it cannot be made very thin since you cannot weld a very thin tube. Hence 6/4 has no mechanical advantages over 3/2.5 despite the marketing hype on 6/4 for bikes. But 6/4 is used on all machined bits like dropouts and brake bridges because they are easier to machine than 3/2.5.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
True but we all believe the marketing blurb, no?

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk


by Weenie


Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post