Pinarello Dogma 60.1 A Day In The Life

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Calnago
Posts: 8549
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

So, yesterday I was readying a Dogma for a trip down south... I built this bike some time ago, made a few tweaks here and there and this is how it's shipping out... 7.52Kg as shown, no detailed build list. It rides really nice. I'm in between Pinarello sizing. This is a "Size 575". It's a tad small for me. The next size up is a 595 which is too big for me. There's some pretty big jumps in certain aspects of the geometry. Neither here nor there since it's not my bike, but just goes to show not all brands, even though it may be a great bike, necessarily fit every individual as perfectly as perhaps another brand might. But it rides really nice. Solid, smooth and predictable.
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Bricks and mortar...
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This Zipp Cross tape is nice, but pretty heavily textured. It really matches the texture on the Campy hoods well, and it doesn't say Zipp all over it, just "Service Corse", which I prefer over a bunch of "Zipp" logos...
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Saddle is light and expensive but does the job I suppose...
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Powertap hubs... front...
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and rear... Oh yeah, since one of the things we did was a wheel swap, these wheels had a Shimano freehub, so we're trying out a Shimano cassette with an otherwise Campy build. I've heard it works fine, and I've played with them in the stand, but this was the first ride I actually did with some weight on it etc. It wasn't a long ride, but it seemed to work just fine, at least acceptable enough that I wouldn't be upset having to use it, at least until any idiosyncracies (if any), showed up...
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This generation Pro Bars went nicely with this build... and while I don't use the inline front derailleur adjuster on my own builds, I always install them on others...
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Oh, and here's the evidence of flex in the BB/chainstay area, which I mentioned in @Imaking's thread...
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There's actually 4mm of clearance between the chainstay and the smallest gap when not being ridden...
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The front ENVE rim is 27mm wide at the brake track. i certainly wouldn't want anythnig wider with rim brakes...
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While I see there's another thread just started about the skyrocketing price of bikes these days, just be thankful you don't have a boat...
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Another angle of the bars, I don't think they make this anatomic bend anymore... I do like the molded in pass through for the cables underneath the bars. It's not "internally routed, but keeps the cables in place without having to wrap the entire bar. I think more bars should be like this...
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Persaonally, I prefer straighter lines, but the Onda style curves certainly do define Pinarellos. You won't mistake them for other brands...
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Test/Shakedown ride done... all good. Time for Salmon Quiche...
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Home, James... before those gray clouds open up... and bonus... I managed to make it home safely before those ENVE 6/7's cut through the tires and blew up. Tires maybe aren't the most supple however... Continental Force (24mm) rear and Attack (22mm) front.
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Last edited by Calnago on Wed Mar 27, 2019 12:10 am, edited 2 times in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

by Weenie


Imaking20
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Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:19 am

by Imaking20

Yowza, that's some serious flex! Awesome looking bike though. I will say that the 26mm width of my rear wheel has me a little uncomfortable - slightly more room on the front but agreed that's about the widest wheel you'd want to try on the older Dogmas!
Current:
Acid Minty

Retired:
Wilier Wonka | The Dentist | The Bucket List | Specialissima | Evo | T2 | Blue | Project C6.0 | Felt AR FRD | Colnago C59 | S-Works Tarmac SL4| S-Works Venge | Wilier Cento1 SL | Tarmac SL2

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Calnago
Posts: 8549
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

I didn’t actually measure the rear wheel at the brake tracks, but I think it may be one of models where the rear is narrower than the front? Not sure, it’s gone now so I can’t check.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

Imaking20
Posts: 2039
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:19 am

by Imaking20

Yes, that's the theme with Enve SES - the rear is typically a couple mm narrower than the front. That alone has had me consider a pair of 3.4 for mine!
Current:
Acid Minty

Retired:
Wilier Wonka | The Dentist | The Bucket List | Specialissima | Evo | T2 | Blue | Project C6.0 | Felt AR FRD | Colnago C59 | S-Works Tarmac SL4| S-Works Venge | Wilier Cento1 SL | Tarmac SL2

rexyi1990
Posts: 258
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2018 3:05 pm

by rexyi1990

beautiful

Mr.Gib
Posts: 3607
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

Are you saying that all that destroyed paint on the chainstay is from the rear end flexing laterally and making contact with the small chainring? Kinda looks like chain-suck damage.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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Calnago
Posts: 8549
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Yup... flex. Not chainsuck. Chainsuck would be further back than that, plus I know the rider and I know how I set it up. I rode it and it was dialed when he brought it in and it was all good. The owner said it has always shifted perfectly as well. And believe me, I’ve drilled it into him, that if ever it was not feeling like it was running perfectly, I want to know about it and I will make it right. If there had been an instance of chainsuck he would have told me; he knows I want to know. He’s a big strong guy and has always had issues with flex, be it wheels or frames. It may be how he rides as well, but it is what it is. Pinarellos have a very beefy chainstay protector in that exact spot as well, so that’s good. We’ve gone through a couple on this bike, so it’s not even really worth putting another one on at this point, as they just get chewed up then then the ragged edges start contacting the chainring and make an annoying ticking sound.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

by Weenie


Mr.Gib
Posts: 3607
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

All I can say is wow - that's a lot of flex. Interesting to think about how the designers were clearly trying to build in compliance and yet they did not have the technology or the knowhow to get the comfort they were after without losing it a bit on lateral rigidity. Speaks a bit to the lameness of this industry. Could you imagine an automobile with this sort of shortcoming being created in the last decade? It is the car equivalent of having the tires hit the top of the wheel well every time you went over a big bump.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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