2019 S-Works Tarmac SL6 Disc (6,900g)

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1llum4
Posts: 88
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2018 6:00 am

by 1llum4

Good choice

Jbass
Posts: 46
Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2018 3:16 am

by Jbass

Very nice build! I’ll be building one myself. Can’t wait to see final weight !

by Weenie


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Rich_W
Posts: 1980
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Location: LBI

by Rich_W

Jbass wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 11:49 pm
Very nice build! I’ll be building one myself. Can’t wait to see final weight !
Thanks! As for the weight, you’ve seen it

2cylinders
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2019 4:09 pm

by 2cylinders

Calnago wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 6:03 pm
parajba wrote:
Rich_W wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:08 pm
Why would there be any reason not to?
If I am not mistaken Zipp and Enve said not to use latex on their carbon rims as they can heat up too much and explode (because carbon does not dissipate heat very well). This is particularly true on long descends.

But things might have changed, just wondering as I love latex tubes.
Do they actually expand on their reasoning as you have, or do they just warn against using latex in their carbon clincher rims? Because heat aside, latex can creep into the seemingly tiniest of crevices and if it manages to wedge a portion of itself in between the bead and the rim, that’s a recipe for disaster irrespective of any heat issues.
I use latex tyres all the time when descending, fastest recorded speed was 99,8km/h, bummer...
Never had an accident with them, it all depends on the sort of descend, the ambient temperature and the rim. I have carbon wheels with alu rims and Schwalbe rim tape.
A lot off people do forget that when ascending the pressure in the tyre rises relative to the pressure at sealevel.
So: Starting at sea level the pressure is 1 bar and ending the ride at 2000 meters it is 0.78 bar.
The tyre if inflated at 8 bar will be 9,84 bar when reaching 2000 meters!
So no wonder some tyres do blow out; height, excessive braking (fear), temperature, wrong pressure and so on...

Mounting them properly is very important:
-Clean the rim with a soft, clean cloth
-Clean the inside of the tyre using a soft cloth
-use talcum powder on the latex tube and some in the outer tyre
-Mount the outer tyre and then the latex tyre
-Make sure that there is no latex tyre visible between rim and outer tyre when pressing the sidewalls, it should lay snug inside the outer tyres walls
-Inflate to 0,5 bar and check AGAIN that there is no latex tyre visible between rim and outer tyre when pressing the sidewalls, now it must be hard to see the latex tyre
-Inflate to 4 bar and check again: Turn the wheel and check for bulging, humps and check the sidewalls and rim
-Inflate to desired pressure
-Enjoy the ride!!!
-(Whilst under way and if you should run a flat; use butyl and a CO2 pump whil save the day, the laytex tube can be reapaired later as per butyl)

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Rich_W
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by Rich_W

All great points, thanks! Talc is the definitely the key... I use on all tubes.

I'm running Challange Latex 21-28mm on my Emonda with Grand Bois 28's Extralight and the ride is absolutely sublime.

Still planning on a set of wider latex tubes for use with my set of Strada Biancha 30s come spring.

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Rich_W
Posts: 1980
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Location: LBI

by Rich_W

Winter mode – Strada Bianchas crush all roadside crud and light gravel! ( :roll: +260g > 7160g)

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Byskov
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2014 8:30 pm

by Byskov

This is just perfect!

How do you like the 'feel' of it compared to the SLR H1? I come from an SLR and the SL6 is on my wishlist for 2019 :)

CallumRD1
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:54 pm

by CallumRD1

2cylinders wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 4:52 pm
[SNIP]

A lot off people do forget that when ascending the pressure in the tyre rises relative to the pressure at sealevel.
So: Starting at sea level the pressure is 1 bar and ending the ride at 2000 meters it is 0.78 bar.
The tyre if inflated at 8 bar will be 9,84 bar when reaching 2000 meters!
So no wonder some tyres do blow out; height, excessive braking (fear), temperature, wrong pressure and so on...

[SNIP]

This isn't true at all. The pressure measured by a tire pressure gauge is simply the difference between the internal pressure of the tire and the atmospheric pressure. Therefore your 8 bar tire pressure at sea level would be 8.22 bar at 2000 meters. That's certainly a difference, but not a huge one. (It's about 3 psi for those who think better in imperial units.)

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Rich_W
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Location: LBI

by Rich_W

Byskov wrote:
Wed Feb 20, 2019 11:04 am
This is just perfect!

How do you like the 'feel' of it compared to the SLR H1? I come from an SLR and the SL6 is on my wishlist for 2019 :)
thank you. If I have describe the two and riding both regularly...

SLR H1 > Snappy acceration, superlight and nimble

SL6 D > Smoooooth, fast and crisp – an aero bike thats not an aero bike.

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Rich_W
Posts: 1980
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Location: LBI

by Rich_W

Direct mount hanger installed

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Rich_W
Posts: 1980
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 1:31 pm
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by Rich_W

Part Number for hanger as I've received a few PMs for it...

S182600003

Jbass
Posts: 46
Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2018 3:16 am

by Jbass

Rich_W wrote:
Sun Feb 24, 2019 12:51 pm
Part Number for hanger as I've received a few PMs for it...

S182600003
What is the advantage of the direct mount hanger?

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Rich_W
Posts: 1980
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Location: LBI

by Rich_W

Jbass wrote:
Sun Feb 24, 2019 6:23 pm
What is the advantage of the direct mount hanger?
Lighter, stiffer, easier wheel changes... and most importantly — all the cool kids have em

sychen
Posts: 626
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2014 1:06 pm

by sychen

Didn't realise the wheel changes are easier.. Only thought it was stiffer. Might have to order one.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

sychen wrote:
Mon Feb 25, 2019 12:19 am
Didn't realise the wheel changes are easier...
They're not, unless the hanger is specifically made to be outside of the specs indicated by Shimano, possibly further back, which would not be out of the realm of possibility for some frames where rear wheel removal was difficult. But there's no free lunch, move that derailleur further back and the rear wheel will be easier to remove at the expense of achieving the most optimal shifting as shimano designed it to be. It's not the hanger itself that makes rear wheel removal difficult on some frames, it's the position of the upper pulley that snags things up even when the derailleur is pulled back as far as it can go. I've discussed this at length in a couple of threads. So, if both hangers are placing the derailleur in the same point in space, as they should be, then rear wheel removal will be unaffected and dependent on other factors regardless of whether a direct mount hanger is used or whether it's attached to the regular hanger via the B-link.
That's not to say a direct hanger may not have some benefits. For sure, you want the derailleur to be as solid and stable as possible in space for the best shifting. If the regular hanger is made of cheese for instance, then attaching the new derailleur with the b-link isn't going to fix that and may make things worse since now you've got an extension on the end of a flexy regular hanger. On the other hand, I'm not at all sure that the direct mount hanger is the place you want to be looking at to save a bunch of weight, for the reason just mentioned. You want it to be a solid, stable part that your derailleur mounts to, after all... it is a pretty critcial piece that plays no small part in achieveing optimal shifting. So if you shave weight somewhere, then the design should be such that lateral stiffness isn't compromsied in the process. For an example, the BMC DM hangers look pretty good and solid, and even though they are pretty "cut out" in the middle they have a pretty thick cross section where the derailleur forces would act on.

However, and this is no small factor... if all the cool kids have 'em... then party on.
Last edited by Calnago on Mon Feb 25, 2019 2:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
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by Weenie


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