Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane meet

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Calnago
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by Calnago

More photodumping...

Geez... another one of the saddle... I guess I like it...
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Getting wheels ready for gluing... after a light sanding with 180 or 120 grit emory cloth and wipedown with acetone...
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Found this little piece of carbon rattling around that I had to get out of the wheel before gluing up. Nothing more annoying that rattling wheels, except rattling frames... well, I guess any rattle is super annoying... get them out before gluing...
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Ready, set.... I use one acid brush per single coat for wheel or tire, then toss it. They are cheap, buy them in packages...
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One thin coat on the rim and one thin coat on the base tape of the tire, then set aside overnight to cure.... next day... one more thin coat on the rim and mount/centre the tire. Normally it's kind of a fight (especially with a Continental), but with these big 27mm Vlanderens, it's easy to overstretch the tire while mounting and actually end up with too much slack at the opposite side of the valve, so takes just one mounting to get familiar with the difference...
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Last edited by Calnago on Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

by Weenie


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Calnago
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by Calnago

And yet, some more....


Originally, this Koppenberg was going to replace my Emonda SL as the dedicated rain bike. Funnily enough, it has even less clearance under the rear brake bridge than the emonda does, and I need a strong 6mm of complete clearance to be able to run my favorite wet tire (Conti Comp 25mm) and full fenders underneath the brake, like shown here on my Emonda... which has the clearance I needed...
I almost sent the Koppenberg back to Trek because it wouldn't work, but in the end I couldn't do it, and ended up very happy that it's now part of the family...
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A break from bikes... not me, just off the beach of White Rock, BC, Canada...
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But this, could definitely be me in a few years if I don't keep biking... hmmm... but that doesn't look too bad either... choices, to each his own... I can go either way. Lol. Best Fish 'n Chips in Canada found at Moby Dick along Marine Drive in White Rock...
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I really should have this guy's permission to publish this... but I did ask his permission before taking the pic of his humble abode along the waterfront. He just looked like the epitomy of "Life is Good, and I don't give a flying F#$% what you think"... I should have asked if I could come up and join him for a relaxing cigar, but I don't think he allows spandex on his porch...
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Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Still more...

The Veloflex Vlanderen... super nice 27mm tubular. Particularly like the dotted tread pattern, kind of like the Continental Comps. Unfortunately, the rear brake bridge clearance, coupled with the flex of the stays and iso-speed, makes these just a smidge on the tight side... but I'm back to running my preferred 25's anyway, which are no problem at all...
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And the newest AC3 brake track found on the latest Boras... noisier than before, but apparently with wear that subsides I'm told. They claim braking is 40% better in the wet than before. Hmmm... I didn't notice that much of a difference... for my money I think I actually prefer the previous versions with Diamante track or whatever it's called...
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This bar tape is also my latest favorite, bartape is like socks for me, I have no problem changing it if I find something I like better... Bontrager Velvetack, and this even has the viper red perforations. At first I thought No, too matchy matchy, but i really like it. It will be on my other bikes when I get around to it as well...
Looks a little smooth here, but that's only becasue it's just been washed down and still wet. It's sort of like Fizik's "Softtouch" stuff (if they still call it that), but thicker and far more durable...
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And the newer K-edge mount that my Garmin 1000 and Urban 800 light get mounted to. It's a lot beefier (geez I've used that word a lot in this thread) than the older version, heavier too... so what... it works and it's super stable...
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Last edited by Calnago on Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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Calnago
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by Calnago

I've gotta be running outta photos soon....

Note the exit of the rear brake cable offset to the side on the Koppenberg (and older domanes and even Emondas)... I like that... it provides for a smooth curve around the seat tube and doesn't rub on anything. The new version, and this goes for the Emondas as well, has the exit point in a little divot in the center...
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Versus the new design... (I don't know the reason for it, but I'm sure there is one)...
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And I still haven't come across a bottle cage I like more than the Arundel Dave-O's. I used to have the Mandible, which are marginally lighter, but due to the thin arms they can tend to "crush" some bottles and feel very tight. These hold the bottles every bit as well, but the pressure is more distributed over the wider arms and both doesn't crush the bottles at all. Removing and replacing the bottles is also easier and smoother than the with mandibles... but you save a few grams with the Mandibles...
Also, the Velcro strap is part of the Lezyne Road Drive Pump mount. I don't use C02 cartridges. On the road, if I do puncture, I'll generally use sealant and gradually pump up the tire. With C02 you can just put too much pressure in all at once and not give the sealant enough of a chance to seal up properly...
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Two centimeters of spacers on the Koppenberg basically gets me to where I am on my other bikes... same as the C59... and although the C60 has two centimeters of spacers as well, its headtube is longer but the stem (a Pro-Vibe), has a -10 degree rise versus the -8 on the Deda, so all bikes end up with the same bar height within a millimeter. My Trek Emonda is about a centimeter higher due to it's H2 geometry and a little red "bling" spacer that I have in it.
The setup below really flows nicely I think from the sculpted shaped headtube up through the tapered top cover and into the spacer stack...
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Sheesh... another saddle shot... ok, I do like it...
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Clean, light, and uncluttered...
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Ok, this is getting ridiculous now... but I've probably bored you all with too much text prior to these last few posts, so what's one more picture of a saddle...
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Last edited by Calnago on Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

FIJIGabe
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by FIJIGabe

Calnago wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:34 pm
(I don't know the reason for it, but I'm sure there is one)...
My understanding is that in an effort to make the frame lighter, they sacrificed carbon on the top tube. To make it stiffer, however, they added the curved shape and integrated the brake exit, to minimize the need for additional carbon. Marginal gains, I guess, but at the expense of rubbed paint. It may also be a slightly easier path to route the brake cabling but after setting up the Madone, this is a walk in the park!
Madone 9 https://goo.gl/7UwZpV
Crockett https://goo.gl/f5PdCN
Madone 5 https://goo.gl/cMdyFo

Madone 4, Cobia. I own a lot of Treks.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Details, details...

I've taken to gluing two 5mm round earth magnets to all my wheels in the same place, so that all my wheels are interchangeable with any of my bikes at any time and the speed will pick up instantly. I tired the Garmin hub mounted accelermoter based speed sensor and didn't like it. Not only does it look like an ugly brick on an otherwise beautiful hub, but it would often take what seemed like forever to pick up. I didn't trust it as much as a magnet based system. As soon as that magnet passes the sensor one revolution, it's is picked up at the head unit. No fuss, no muss...
Obviously I had to figure out where the magnet needs to be for the fixed DuoTrap sensors since they cannot be repositioned, and then I would just position the moveable sensors on my other bikes to match up with it. The Duo-Trap sensor below is not quite the same as the newest Duo-Trap S sensor found on my Emonda, but it actually has more clearance so that works out for me. With the newest Duo-Trap sensor, there are some wheel/spoke magnet clearance issues that you can fiddle to work around.
I use AquaSeal as the flexible bonding agent to sandwich the spoke in between the two small magnets... holds great, better than just trying to glue a single manet to just one side of the spoke...
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The Lizard Skin "Carbon Leather" chainstay protector. Just slapped it on right over top of the clear protector. Really does eliminate the noise of any chain slap if there is any...
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I use Teflon liners and grub seals here to keep all derailleur lines clean and running smoothly, with minimum maintenance...
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I really like the combo chain catcher and SRM magnet that K-edge puts out...
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What the hell... it's anything goes picture time...
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Leftover evidence of my crash on my C59. I always orient my rear skewers like this because it's both neat and out of the way, but it also provides good frame protection in the event of a crash. Maybe I'll magic marker over the scraped up end, but a few war wounds are sexy... chicks dig it....
Also, Campy skewers are much more able to "wrap around" the stays than the new Dura-Ace skewers. Campy wins out on this one...
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Just a warning to stay away from open flames...
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What the Velvetack bartape looks like when it's dry and dusty...
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Last edited by Calnago on Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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Calnago
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by Calnago

FIJIGabe wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:44 pm
Calnago wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:34 pm
(I don't know the reason for it, but I'm sure there is one)...
My understanding is that in an effort to make the frame lighter, they sacrificed carbon on the top tube. To make it stiffer, however, they added the curved shape and integrated the brake exit, to minimize the need for additional carbon. Marginal gains, I guess, but at the expense of rubbed paint. It may also be a slightly easier path to route the brake cabling but after setting up the Madone, this is a walk in the park!
Yes, I heard the reasoning may have been much like you say... but didn't have positive verification of that so I didn't say it. Fine to beef up the edges so they could lose weight in the middle, but damn... I can squeeze and indent an SLR top tube with my fingers. That's not happening with this frame. Tradeoffs.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Ok, back to the photodumping...


A little break off the beaten tarmac...
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Another shot of a wet Vlanderen...
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Those dropouts look funny...
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Full spare Veloflex Carbon or Roubaix or Arrenberg in that little drybag strapped under the saddle. Hardly ever need to resort to that as sealant generally works in the event of a puncture. Still, in the cases where sealant fails or the tire just gets damaged beyond repair, I wouldn't want to be without a spare...
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I still love mechanical drive trains, set up properly they are very clean looking with nice symetrical cable flow... and no electrical junction boxes and little wires everywhere... I know... SRAM is wireless...
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But there's nothing sexier imo than the Campagnolo mechanical rear derailleur...
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I just can't get enough of that massive beautifully sculpted downtube...
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And that, boys and girls, is about all I've got! I think I'm done. So, unless there's anymore questions... till next time...

Cal
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

FIJIGabe
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Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 6:07 pm
Location: The Lone Star State

by FIJIGabe

I previously mentioned that I recently bought my wife a first-gen Domane Disc, and I was thinking of selling it, thinking that the newer generation stuff was better (you know, newer is better), but I think reviewing your thread, and how similar that frame is to yours (in terms of cable routing and the lack of too many gimmicks - aside from the IsoSpeed and disc brakes), I'm very happy with the acquisition. I'll create a thread to describe the build, and my hope is to get that bike to the same weight as her standard Domane 6, and we can compare notes on the build.

Now if only Shimano would release 8070...
Madone 9 https://goo.gl/7UwZpV
Crockett https://goo.gl/f5PdCN
Madone 5 https://goo.gl/cMdyFo

Madone 4, Cobia. I own a lot of Treks.

shuttlenote
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by shuttlenote

Probably one of the nicest treks on ww.

Are you from BC or just visiting?

Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

Funny to see the fender mount behind the bottom bracket on this frame. And yet no such mounts that I noticed on the dropouts as per most other Treks.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Regarding that one fender mount behind the BB, yes, a lot of it is from the same mold as the Domane after all, but the layup is different...
The newest Classics version (Pro-Endurance Geometry) that you could actually buy through Project One has fender mounts all around the whole thing. I guess Degenkolb doesn't want to get dirty during Roubaix.
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The above photos were taken from Above Category's website where they spent some time with the new Pro-Endurance Domane last year. I'm not sure if they thought they were on Koppenberg geometry or not, but they got such a key point so wrong, that the writeup lost credibility for me and I just looked at the pics...
Here's what they wrote, which couldn't be more incorrect..."Can the quick steering be nervous? Of course. It takes a bit more care and attention than a more staid, slower-handling Grand Tour bike, like its siblings the Emonda and Madone, or any litany of production bikes..." Whoa, I immediately thought... They're really confused here. The newest Pro-Endurance geometry (which they seemed to be testing and talking about), is not even comparable to the Emonda or Madone, or Koppenberg for that matter, at least not in the way they are describing. Those last three bikes all share essentially the same geometry, and they are all much quicker, not slower handling, than the Domane they were talking about. I think they may have gotten confused by looking at the front end of the bike only, which does have a quicker geo than the standard Domane, but it is also coupled to a much longer wheelbase, lower BB, and longer chainstays. For example, compared to my Koppenberg, the same size Pro-Edurance geometry has a whopping 4cm (3.9cm to be exact) longer wheelbase than the Koppenberg. It is by no means an overall quicker handling bike than the Emonda, Madone, or Koppenberg. I just went back to that article to see if it is still there as I remember it and sure enough, it is... I just copied it and quoted it above. https://abovecategorycycling.com/journa ... anereview/

Anyway, it's not like they were the first reviewers to be confused by this bike. Way back in 2012 I think, reviews talking about Cancellara riding the Domane, not just in the Classics, but in the Grand Tours, were saying stuff like "he prefers the relaxed geometry of the Domane... " blah blah, when in fact he was on nothing of the sort in the Grand Tours. It shared some Domane traits, but the geometry was not relaxed. I think it all got sorted out in the end, then everyone realized this was a very unique "Domane", and it was offered to the public in a very limited way as I've described earlier as the "Koppenberg".

Cancellara has said that it's the best bike he's ever ridden. Coming from a sponsored rider, of course you have to take that with a grain of salt, but in this case I'm more inclined to believe it because 1) He was very involved in its development from the beginning, as opposed to the sponsor just handing him their bike and saying "here's what we got, ride it" and don't talk any smack about it"; and 2) I have actually ridden it to confirm a lot of what I expected it might be like to ride; and 3) If it wasn't for Cancellara, I'm not sure they would have gone to the expense of creating the Koppenberg, so Domane like, yet at the same time so Emonda like, to be ridden in the Grand Tours yet not really marketed in a big way as it's own special thing. They could have just said "No, the Madone is our bike for the Tours at the moment, ride it please". I would love to know the conversations that led to the actual production of the Koppenberg.
Last edited by Calnago on Mon Mar 05, 2018 9:39 pm, edited 9 times in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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Calnago
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by Calnago

shuttlenote wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:40 pm
Probably one of the nicest treks on ww.

Are you from BC or just visiting?
Born and raised in BC, born in Vancouver. No longer living there, but close enough to visit.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

glepore
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by glepore

What camera/lens are you using?
Cysco Ti custom Campy SR mechanical (6.9);Cannondale SS Evo Di2 7970 (5.79); Willier Cento Uno Air Di2 9070 (7.0); C40 Mk2 DA 7800 ; Anvil Custom steel Etap;1996 Colnago Technos Record

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Mostly Canon lenses, with a 5D3 body. Or a Sony RX100, or an iPhone 6.
The Canon lense mostly used for pics in this thread is the 2.8 24-70L. For profile full bike shots, with the bike in a stand, I like to use the 70-200iiL Lense at around 135mm focal length, so as to kind of get the handlebar profile looking like there's just one half showing, with the other side directly behind it. But on the road, or if it’s leaning against a wall somewhere, I’m likely on a ride and I take the RX100 sometimes cuz it fits nicely in a sandwich Ziploc and my jersey pocket. But the iphone takes such good pics on the road that that's usually all I take.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

by Weenie


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