Trek Supercaliber Custom Build

Discuss light weight issues concerning mountain bikes & parts.

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protocol_droid
Posts: 245
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 7:40 am
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by protocol_droid

MattMay wrote:Do NOT get an UNNO Horn. I did...yes, the frame is beautiful and light (it was 1920g with shock), but within 6 normal XC rides the frame developed a crack at the junction of seatpost, downtube, and bottom bracket. What first alerted me was my drive side crank started nicking the chainstay under torque. I sent the frame back, they refunded my $ in full, and the explanation was "bad batch of carbon affecting a whole run of frames." Huh? They gave me the option to wait a few months while they figured things out and get a new frame, but I had lost confidence. Anyway, I'm taking delivery today of a Supercaliber frame (medium). I'll post my build as it develops. Hoping for something under 22 lbs.

Btw, pic of Horn crack:

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Sent from my SM-G965U1 using Tapatalk

naked 3po, the first weight weenie.

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MattMay
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by MattMay

Supercaliber frame size medium arrived today, weighing in at 1995g including seat clamp, rear axle, derailleur hanger. The build begins,pics to follow. Goal: sub 22 lbs with dropper, pedals included. Fingers crossed.

by Weenie


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robbosmans
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by robbosmans

MattMay wrote:Supercaliber frame size medium arrived today, weighing in at 1995g including seat clamp, rear axle, derailleur hanger. The build begins,pics to follow. Goal: sub 22 lbs with dropper, pedals included. Fingers crossed.
Honest question: why go for a Trek Supercaliber when there are “real” full suspension xc bikes lighter?

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MattMay
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by MattMay

Because it’s well suited to the type of riding I like, and I just had a bad experience with the lightest of the light. Scroll up.

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robbosmans
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by robbosmans

MattMay wrote:Because it’s well suited to the type of riding I like, and I just had a bad experience with the lightest of the light. Scroll up.
I understand if you dont need all the travel, its just that a Specialized Epic or Orbea Oiz is lighter and has more sus

But it is a very good looking bike, the review on the Unno was surprising at first but understandable, something you don’t hear from the press

Thanks for the answer

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MattMay
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by MattMay

I looked at both the Epic (Evol, I’ve tried the Brain and don’t like it) and Oiz. Both months from delivery and well into 2021 at least here in So Cal. As far as lightness, a 100-200g in static weight difference is virtually meaningless especially when you throw a couple of water bottles on your frame. I know, blasphemy on a weight weenies forum. I’m fine with anything in the 2K range, give or take. Also, I prefer waiting until the second model year of any new bike. Probably just a superstition. I know one thing: the build quality on the Supercaliber is, well, super. I’ve had a few Spesh and Scott bikes, and the attention to detail on this frame is strong. And it’s not fragile in any way like some others. Finally, I guess I appreciate technological innovation (isostrut) and design, being of that industry. Hope I’m not disappointed again!

First project: changing the color way. The frame is matte black with gloss black as the second frame color. Wish the logos had been gloss black instead of silverfish color. So I made them gloss black. Took a few hours, measuring, Adobe Illistrator, and a Cameo 4 cutter, but I got it done.

Before:

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After:
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MattMay
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by MattMay

Final build, mission (sub 22 lb/10 kg) accomplished, but just barely!! 21.94 lbs/9.95 kg with dropper post and including pedals, as pictured:

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Build list:

2021 Supercaliber medium frameset, no fork or isostrut remote lockout, Hopp Carbon non knock block frame chip

Light bicycle WXMC29 wheelset, I9 Hydra hubs, Sapim CXRay spokes, 25mm internal width, flyweight front, standard rear (1393g w valves and tape)

SRAM DUB Eagle XX1 groupset, 175mm cranksets

Fox Float Factory kashima 32 Stepcast fork, FIT4 3-position damper; Wolftooth headset

Fox Transfer dropper, 100mm, Wolftooth REmote

Shimano XTR m9000 brakes, Ice Tec DuraAce rotors

Tune carbon flat bar, 750mm

Extralite stem, 70mm

WTB Silverado saddle, carbon rails

Crank bros Candy 11 pedals

Crank bros Cobalt grips

Racing Ray, Racing Ralph, tubeless 2.25

Supacaz bottle cages

Jaguar elite link shift cable, gold and black (bought set of each to make a mix)

Homemade gloss black vinyl Trek amd Supercaliber lettering

Fox Stepcast stealth decals

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nickf
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by nickf

Im on the fence about the supercaliber. How does it ride on not so smooth trails? I love the idea of the bike, the pedaling efficiency. On a 6hr race, I'm not so sure though. Once I get to hour 5 I can tend to get a little sloppy and not pick the best line. My last generation 9.8 top fuel is 21.75 lbs with pedals, no exotic parts. The supercaliber would be about the same weight or more and I'm giving up rear travel. I was hoping the supercaliber would have been much lighter.

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MattMay
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by MattMay

Can’t see a reason to switch honestly. The newer Top Fuels are more like 25 lbs....I’d stick with what you have! 21.75 lbs is super light especially if you have a dropper.

But to answer your question, for me it’s all I need for the kinds of xc trails I ride...the most techy stuff is like what you’ll see in World Cup xco races...llike Nove Mesto this past week. Obviously it’s being ridden competitively by the likes of Anton Cooper, Simon Tempier, Evie Richards, Jolanda Neff and Emily Batty (who just completed a huge bikepacking trip in Iceland on it).

It rides and feels like a 100mm traditional full suspension bike. I’ve yet to max out the travel. Super comfortable, and I’ve have past back problems. On the road the isostrut suspension doesn’t move, even when I stand...and I do not use lockout, I didn’t even install the remote, so it’s open at all times. Set and forget.

scant
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by scant

MattMay wrote:
Mon Oct 05, 2020 4:52 pm
On the road the isostrut suspension doesn’t move, even when I stand...and I do not use lockout, I didn’t even install the remote, so it’s open at all times. Set and forget.
thats interesting info

Vik61
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Joined: Sat Sep 03, 2016 5:55 am

by Vik61

MattMay wrote:
Sat Sep 19, 2020 7:59 am
Supercaliber frame size medium arrived today, weighing in at 1995g including seat clamp, rear axle, derailleur hanger.
Do you have a photo on scales?

What can you say about comparison with Unno frame on trails? I think, both of them do not need rear lockout, but they have totally different suspension types.
Thanks anyway!

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MattMay
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by MattMay

My scale pics are above. Don’t have one just of frame tho. With all hardware on, the difference was maybe 100g between the Horn and Supercaliber.

Compared to the Horn, this bike feels better in every way. I love it, and didn’t think I would. The Horn only came in one size and it wasn’t ideal.

It rides like a 100mm rear suspension bike. I’m not a huge stand and hammer guy but when I do the suspension doesn’t move, or if it does it’s imperceptible at least to me. So I don’t need the lockout.

On descents it’s more stable, maybe due to wheelbase differences but in general it’s just a much better designed and built bike. So much plastic in the Horn linkages it just felt flimsy.

I’ve been setting PRs on descents which is interesting since I’m not really trying to set any. And some climbs have improved as well. It’s a fast bike. Maybe it’s just because it fits me so well.

In the past thre years I’ve had an SWorks Epic HT, an SC Blur cc, an Unno Horn, and the Supercaliber. This is the keeper.

I don’t have a long term review, but given the option to ride this, my 3T Exploro, or my SC 5010 trail bike, I reach for this 8 times out of 10.

Vik61
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by Vik61

Matt, thanks a lot! It's very helpfull.

I'm looking for xc suspension machine, with maximum climbing perfomance. We have a lot of roots on a trails and my back begs for mercy after 2 hours of cycling on hardtail.
I'm choosing betwin SC Blur /new Scalpel / Orbea Oiz. May be new Epic with brain. And now I have a good deal for money - Supercaliber.
Many of my friends loves Blur and only Blur, but it's no too agile as for me. It's more enduro bikes, not superclimber.

One of my friends have a new Unno, and he advertises it as the best xc machine ever )) It was intresting to see your opinion, thanks.
Horn frame on scales 1512g + 25g hanger + 250g Fox shock = 1787g
Anyway Horn it's not fit for me well. I'm 182 cm long and need another frame reach.

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MattMay
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by MattMay

Sure thing. My Unno was gloss finish and came in a tad under 1900g with seatpost collar and rear thru axle in addition to what you listed.

It was among a batch that UNNO said they had frame crack problems with so it may have been a different/bad layup...mine cracked within a few rides. They blamed it on their carbon supplier. I was surprised that it was so heavy.

The Supercaliber and Blur frames in medium were within a few grams of each other for me.

I was looking at the Oiz as well but got a February delivery date for a medium frameset with custom color way so that was a no go.

Finally, I had back issues with a hardtail as well. No problems with the Supercaliber after a month with four or so 1.5 to 3 hour rides a week.

TheRich
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by TheRich

MattMay wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 5:52 pm
I’ve been setting PRs on descents which is interesting since I’m not really trying to set any. And some climbs have improved as well. It’s a fast bike. Maybe it’s just because it fits me so well.
This right here is why comparisons between the SC and new TF vs. the old TF need to get away from relying on weight alone.

People ride at their comfort level based on the feedback they get. Because of the improved geometry of the newer models, your comfort level doesn't change, the speed at which you reach it does. Btw, the vast majority of suspension feedback is going to come from the forks, straight to the rider's hands, not the rear suspension or lack of same.

by Weenie


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