anyone else thinking disc brakes and electronic gears....

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
User avatar
maddog 2
Posts: 347
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 7:58 pm
Location: Lancaster, UK

by maddog 2

Personally, the Di2 thing isn't one I'm that bothered about really. Not against it, but I'd spend elsewhere before going lecky. A few mates run it but it's not obvious what the real benefit is TBH.

But I'm inching to get a disc-roadie sorted, and I'm frustrated that the bike companies are so slow on this. Sure there are a few alu framed options but very few carbon frames in the shops. Enve have a disc fork ready to go, and Easton have a decent disc wheelset which should be ready soon, so it's happening slowly. My commuter is already disc'd up but it's a CX frame so not quite the right tool for the faster rides.

If I could build the road bike I really want it would:

- be carbon
- have hydro discs
- run tubeless
- internal cables

cymans
Posts: 95
Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 10:17 pm

by cymans

I have a project on the drawing board for a road bike with Di2 and disc brakes.
I plan to have full internal routing for the brake lines and of course the Di2 cables.
This will also incorporate a custom carbon stem/handlebar combo.
Also will have to use swivel joints for the steering.
May have to make new levers with master cylinder and switches for Di2.
Should be interesting.
I will post some pic's when the process starts.
Cyman.

by Weenie


User avatar
stella-azzurra
Posts: 5072
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2006 6:35 am
Location: New York

by stella-azzurra

The reason why you have discs on MTB's is to be able to stop effectively in the situation of wet and muddy conditions not really from high speed descends.

Conversely it's pretty rare that you find muddy conditions on the road like you do off road like the side of a mountain.
It's pretty rare that you will be doing 50-60 mph down the side of the mountain like you do on the road on a MTB.

Yes there the dare devils that find a somewhat smooth track down the side of the mountain but for the most part MTB's do not go down the side of the mountain at the same speed as a road bike on a paved road.

If you think you will get better braking performance by putting disk brakes on a road bike during normal dry conditions I would be hard pressed to see this. In wet conditions it's a different story.

So to recap disc brakes are great on mtb's in wet muddy conditions. Cantilever brakes are great also on MTB and cross bikes but not as effective as the disc brakes in wet muddy conditions.

Road bikes brake effectively with the current dual pivot brakes, good pads, and machined rims on dry roads. In wet conditions the brake pads can be changed for better braking as well.

I would not mind having disc brakes on a road bike I would use for training in wet weather though.

Aside from having good brakes it's the riders expertise in inclement weather to be able to stop and maneuver the bike in adverse conditions.

When I think of wet weather conditions on the road I think of the 89' WCC. Balls to the wall in wet conditions at 60 mph.
I wonder what kind of brake pads they had :lol:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJSgzHTRg38
I never took drugs to improve my performance at any time. I will be willing to stick my finger into a polygraph test if anyone with big media pull wants to take issue. If you buy a signed poster now it will not be tarnished later. --Graeme Obree

User avatar
maddog 2
Posts: 347
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 7:58 pm
Location: Lancaster, UK

by maddog 2

If you think you will get better braking performance by putting disk brakes on a road bike during normal dry conditions I would be hard pressed to see this


I have discs on my commuter. They are better. Whether you can "see" that they are, when you don't have them, is hardly relevant.

I've never been to New York*. As far as I can see, there is no reason to either.





* I have but ...

User avatar
stella-azzurra
Posts: 5072
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2006 6:35 am
Location: New York

by stella-azzurra

My friend has disk brakes and I used his bike. I also serviced them. You don't really need to own something to see how it performs.
I never took drugs to improve my performance at any time. I will be willing to stick my finger into a polygraph test if anyone with big media pull wants to take issue. If you buy a signed poster now it will not be tarnished later. --Graeme Obree

User avatar
MetaCarbon
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:29 am
Location: North Carolina...for now

by MetaCarbon

Hey

Whoever thought that carbon fiber can't be used in a rotor on a bicycle might want to reconsider. I see no reason not to use these on a road bike and they also look cooler.

I came across this:

http://www.bikerumor.com/2012/09/28/found-alligators-prototype-carbon-kevlar-ceramic-disc-brake-rotor/

http://www.alien-machinery.com.tw/

Test Videos on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=xp6IdYEs4qo&NR=1

Estelja
Posts: 227
Joined: Tue Jun 23, 2009 10:47 pm

by Estelja

Another entry into carbon-ceramic disc rotors. This one is 40g in a 140mm:

http://www.bikerumor.com/2012/11/14/fou ... more-51894

Dammit
Posts: 443
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 8:16 pm

by Dammit

I'd planned to switch this to Ultegra Di2, now I'm waiting to see if SRAM get their act together and release their Hydro drop bar levers, now that we've seen the pre-production units in use:

Image

The appeal of electronic shifting and discs being "it just works, perfectly, all the time, every time" being strongest on a winter bike (and, as observed up thread, ALL THE TOYS).

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post