Tubular Repair

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
jasjas
Posts: 131
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2009 10:15 am

by jasjas

fdegrove wrote:Hi,

If you can't do the job yourself then, yes, it probably won't be economically viable for someone else to do it for you.

Ciao, ;)



Well, i found an article on tube replacement and as the tub is useless.... i had a go.... apparently pull back base tape nr valve, as per a puncture and then cut tube, tie string to one end and pull out, get a new latex tube and cut in same place, pull through using the string, overlap ends of tube and glue!, test for leaks and restitch.
Is this how its done and what glue would anyone recommend? i got as far as tying the string, the damaged tube is too sticky to pull through :(

fdegrove
Tubbie Guru
Posts: 5851
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 2:20 am
Location: Belgium

by fdegrove

Hi,

The minumum requirement for it to work is to be able to pull the inner tube out in one piece with a string attached to the opposite end of the stem.
A latex inner tube is assembled using the same kind of glue as used to patch a butyl inner tube.

Ciao, ;)
Last edited by fdegrove on Sun Oct 07, 2012 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.

by Weenie


crohnsy
Posts: 439
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 6:43 pm
Location: Canada

by crohnsy

Had something interesting happen over the weekend, curious if this has happened to anyone else...

Riding Bontrager XXX tubs and rode over a small sharp rock close to home lost about 20psi but still made it home. Pumped back up before I looked for the rock and noticed after about 90 minutes tire was flat. Was busy so Tuesday after removing the shard of rock at lunch I pumped the tire to see how much air I would loose and to confirm the hole, well no noticeable air coming out and I went back to work. When I got home 4 hours later the tire was still full of air.. Any thoughts as to why? Magic?

fdegrove
Tubbie Guru
Posts: 5851
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 2:20 am
Location: Belgium

by fdegrove

Hi,

That can happen but I'm sure the inner tube is still punctured and leaking ever so slowly.
What occured is that the shard penetrated the casing at an angle pushing the inner tube forward and eventually puncturing it.
Now that the shard has been removed the punctured area of the inner tube is back to its normal position where the casing is not damaged.

Should you now ride the bike you may notice it will leak air much faster, much like a slow leak would in fact.

If it doesn't then yes: magic. Or worse: voodoo :lol:

Ciao, ;)
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.

crohnsy
Posts: 439
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 6:43 pm
Location: Canada

by crohnsy

Thanks fde, that's kind of what I was thinking.

I'll probably be shunned for this but I'm going to squirt some Stan's sealant in and see how things hold up..

sawyer
Posts: 4481
Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2006 7:45 pm
Location: Natovi Landing

by sawyer

Kasparz wrote:
sawyer wrote:2000+ posts to my name so pots and kettles and all that, but I must say this thread still makes the mind boggle at the amount of time people have to fiddle about on this stuff :shock: Just binning three almost new tubs today if any of you seamsters are interested?

If anyone of you guys have punctured tubulars that still have life in it, instead of trashing them you can always send them to me. I punctured 3 tubs in 3 weeks and at that rate I will run out of my budget and time repairing them. I punctured almost new EVO CX in todays race first 200 meters. Pissed.



Send me a stamped, addressed package for them and I'll do that. Make sure it can be posted in a letterbox as I'm queueing up to send it.
----------------------------------------
Stiff, Light, Aero - Pick Three!! :thumbup:

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LouisN
Posts: 2320
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:44 am
Location: Canada

by LouisN

After a crash last tuesday, the rubber rolling band on my front tub came unglued on one side (about 7-8mm).
I had the front shifter, as well as part of the handlebar of another rider in my front wheel spokes, and it destroyed the fork. The rim is saved, and the tub is OK.

The question is: Is Barge cement fine to glue the rolling band back on?

Louis:)

fdegrove
Tubbie Guru
Posts: 5851
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 2:20 am
Location: Belgium

by fdegrove

Hi,

Barge cement can be used to glue the base tape back on, i.e. textile to rubber.

To put the tread back where it belongs you can try to clean all parts that will be glued together with alcohol first then use the same type of glue that is used to fix a punctured butyl inner tube and follow the same set of instructions that come with your glue.

Ciao, ;)
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.

User avatar
LouisN
Posts: 2320
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:44 am
Location: Canada

by LouisN

I finally used Barge cement, as the rubber band was totally ripped from the textile casing. Looks and feels very good IMO.
Heck, I even used the Barge to glue back on the upper from my Bont shoes that ripped from the carbon bottom (in the crash...). Looks excellent up to now.

Louis :)

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SalsaLover
Posts: 444
Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:21 pm
Location: Zürich, Switzerland

by SalsaLover

Can someone tell me what is that barge cement and what is its name in Europe?

Preferably a French or German name would help me better to find it in Switzerland
Hucken The Fard Up !
Colnagos : C50 ST01 - Master 30th AD10 - C40 Mapei WC

crohnsy
Posts: 439
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 6:43 pm
Location: Canada

by crohnsy

You can find more info on barge cement here:
http://bit.ly/TyNQYK

fdegrove
Tubbie Guru
Posts: 5851
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 2:20 am
Location: Belgium

by fdegrove

Hi,

I doubt you'd find Barge cement on the old continent. Perhaps the U.K....
Either way, what you want is a strong adhesive to glue textile to rubber that stays relatively supple.
Basically a decent shoemaker's glue would do the job if only you could find a shoemaker that actually still repairs shoes by hand.... :(

Personally I use Terokal 2444 which is an industrial grade glue that we sometimes use to glue on tubulars for special events. Don't use it as such unless you're prepared to cut that tub off the rim should you experience a puncture.

Ciao, ;)
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.

User avatar
Werdna
Posts: 100
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 3:45 am

by Werdna

I successfully repaired a Vittoria EVO CX today, my very first attempt at tubular repair.
It took ~30min from start to finish. The hardest part was removing the base tape from the tire;
A good tip is to stick a sharp razor blade under the tape to get it started, just be very careful.
It is currently sitting on an old rim, I pumped it to 150psi and it was holding great, only slightly (very slightly) deformed where I had to stitch the casing up.

To those worried about the inconvenience of riding tubulars and tubular repair,
Do not worry about it! Rumors of tubular hassles are greatly exaggerated.
Thanks to everyone for the wonderful tips.

crewdoglm
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2012 3:52 am

by crewdoglm

We tried this back in junior racing days because we mowed lawns for tire money. I was never succcesful. The problem I had was re-sewing the thing. It always left a big tumor in the tire which would explode dramatically after an hour or so. It's also difficult to re-glue the cotton strip so it's truly secure. Anyway the needle you want is a curved one - like for leather or heavy canvas. For thread, I suggest gutting some 550 parachute cord and using a single strand of the nylon - standard survival school sewing. Better still, ring-toss the dead one onto a fence post, change it and press on.

by Weenie


crewdoglm
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2012 3:52 am

by crewdoglm

Sounds like some other guys are good at this. Impressive!

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