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 Post subject: Domestic Professional
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 5:23 am 
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Joined: Thu May 31, 2012 3:11 am
Posts: 6
I'm coming to you with a question regarding a long term training plan.

I'm currently serving in the military with 3 years to go. I am about to upgrade to Cat 3, and am wondering what kind of long term training plan I would need over the next 3 years to get to be a domestic pro. My question isn't about specific details, more about the things I should be

looking to incorporate into my training as I progress. I'm 24, rowed as a Lightweight rower through college, was selected for the 2010 Under 23 World Rowing Championships where my partner and I placed higher than any US boat in the LM 2-, and then was selected for the US Lightweight 8+ for the 2010 Senior World Rowing Championships, where we placed 5th.

I feel I have a decent understanding of training, at least as far as rowing is concerned, and I have read the Training Bible. I will be getting a power meter soon. I love cycling and would want to go as far as I can in the sport.

Currently, I'm doing alot of trainer work, racing in local races in California as my schedule permits. I feel longer road races suit me as I'm not as technically proficient at crits and TT is where I feel I do my best.

If anyone has any advice I would be grateful. I'm looking for long term considerations, not necessarily specific workouts, although I love trying new workouts. Thank you for any advice, I appreciate all your help.


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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 7:20 am 
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If you're aiming that high it would probably be best to get a coach, and consult regularly.

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Posted: Thu May 31, 2012 7:20 am 


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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 8:57 am 
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The first question is:- do you really want to be a domestic pro? Whilst it almost seems a silly question there are considerations. There is a big difference to racing at a pro level and actually being a pro.

The second consideration is your age. You'll be 27/28 when pursuing this. It is 100% possible to be a very good domestic pro at this age. But you'll have to either a) know someone or b) seriously smoke people in some races to get noticed. Here is Oz the majority of domestic pro riders have either proved themselves at the highest levels and/or have been riding and racing since they could talk. You are effectively trying to play catch up for years and years of experience and conditioning. Once again, this CAN and has been done.

Next is your skill set. If you're on a team you don't get to pick and choose your races. "Not liking crits" is not good enough. You have to race and you have to perform.


Your background in rowing is an excellent base to have. Having a coach is not a nessecity but someone that can objectively review your training, goals etc in the long term can be a very good idea.


My points are all for consideration only. I will state once again that becoming a domestic pro is doable but you have to know what you are up against.

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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 6:14 pm 
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As a rower, you know already know how to suffer more than most cyclists. Your National Team background suggests you've got the genetic talent to be an elite in any aerobic sport. Get a good coach and start building up your training volume. Also, read "Training and Racing with a PowerMeter". Then race as much as you can and try to learn race smarts - something most ex-rowers lack as they try to overpower everyone from the gun.

Bottom line, get a good coach. A very good one.


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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 7:22 pm 
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Think theres a few members of team GB track team that were rowers, im sure if you have the right stuff, time and deadication its doable


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2012 3:52 am 
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Thanks for the responses. I'll certainly look into finding a coach, which leads me to another question: Any recommendations for coaches in the LA and San Diego area?

I am serious about trying to go as far as I can after I finish my time in the military. Right now it's a bit difficult to fit much volume into my training, as anyone with unpredictable hours can attest.

I appreciate all the help and would appreciate any other tips or suggestions!


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2012 10:37 am 
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Location: Los Angeles / Glendale, California
Nate Loyal (LA) (nateloyal.com)
Ron Peterson (LA) (petersontraining.com)

Both have coached domestic and international pros.
Yes, that is Cavendish on RP's home page.

Don't know of any coaches in SD, only rather attractive women from there that I've woo'd or have had the pleasure of spending time with. They were fun.

PS: If you know of any single rowing ladies, I can make myself available. 8)
PPS: No, really.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2012 12:05 pm 
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Formerly known as wassertreter

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m103348 wrote:
I appreciate all the help and would appreciate any other tips or suggestions!

Have a backup plan for the case of things not panning out. (Or anyway for the time after retiring from pro cycling)

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2012 2:56 pm 
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Good luck! FYI- I have known a few people who started late and made it into the pro rankings, they went from cat 4 to 1 in a year or so, winning or podiuming in almost all the races they entered. One wore the pink jersey for a few days this year. Some people are genetically superior to others. I went from Cat 5-1 in three years in CX as a master but would never have made it to the true Pro level if younger.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 6:01 am 
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Thanks for the coach suggestions!

Besides for upping volume and trying to race whenever possible, any other suggestions out there for basic training concepts to focus on for the next few years? I know it's incredibly vague, but I'm just trying to work out some things I can work on.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 7:27 am 
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Race everything you can get your hands on. Road races, crits, TTs, multi-stage races on all the different sorts of terrain you can. The training you can probably workout, but racing can only be replicated by racing.

_________________
"Physiology is all just propaganda and lies... all waiting to be disproven by the next study."
"I'm not a real doctor; But I am a real worm; I am an actual worm." - TMBG


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 Post subject: Domestic Professional
PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 8:16 am 
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Contacts, it's definitely the most important way to break into the pro scene.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 5:50 pm 
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Well thanks guys, I'm looking forward to gearing up over the next few years. It's a long way out, but it should be an interesting ride.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 3:27 am 
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We have a local guy who transitioned into cycling around 26-27. He was an avid runner most of his life (so I assume he already had a great cardiovascular system). He went from Cat5-1 in his first year, and pro the next year.

Not sure if rowing with give a similar base, because you're really only building slow-twitch in your upper body.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 5:44 am 
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Biomechanically rowing is exceptionally similar to cycling, many rowers transition very well to cycling.

Rowing is hardly an "upper body" aerobic sport as I am sure any rower will testify. Power is all in them thar legs.

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"Physiology is all just propaganda and lies... all waiting to be disproven by the next study."
"I'm not a real doctor; But I am a real worm; I am an actual worm." - TMBG


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Posted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 5:44 am 


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