Zipp carbon rims compatible w/ Reynolds Carbon Baradine Pads

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aeroslave
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by aeroslave

I am new to Zipp carbon wheelsets and have recently purchased a Zipp 808 wheelset. I have an Assault wheelset and the Reynolds brakepads are installed in my bike.

Is it ok to use the standard Reynolds carbon specific baradine brake pads with my Zipp 808 OR do I need to buy specific Zipp pads?

aeroslave
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by aeroslave

I tried to search but there was nothing on this topic...usually its the reverse Zipp pads on reynolds rims.

by Weenie


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Juanmoretime
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by Juanmoretime

While I know Campy makes the claim to use only their carbon pads with the Bora, I think Zipp does this too. I would say its safe to use any carbon designated pad with any carbon rim.
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ericm
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by ericm

Not always- Reynolds says not to use cork pads on their carbon rims.

aeroslave
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by aeroslave

Bump!

Johnny Rad
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by Johnny Rad

I'm intrigued by Zipp's Tangente cork pads, but ride Reynolds carbon wheels. Zipp's cork pads been out for how long now? I'm clearly not an early adopter! Ha.

One (me) wonders if Reynolds recommends against cork pads because a significant competitor (Zipp) sells cork pads.

Is this too much conspiracy theory?

Is there an identifiable reason why cork pads aren't "compatible" with the Reynolds carbon wheels?

Who's using Zipp Tangente cork pads on their Reynolds carbon wheels?

cswi9367
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by cswi9367

i am using zipp's tangente cork pad on my reynolds.

the reynolds pads worked well, but the zipps are much better. especially in the rain. there is no problem using the cork pad on these rims. if anything, the cork is easier on the rim than the baradine pad.

i suggest these.

i am guessing just because they are a competitors item.

czvekslak
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by czvekslak

Cork heets up carbon more than Reynolds Beradine or synthetic pads such as Swiss Stop.

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lancejohnson
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by lancejohnson

I was under the opposite impression. I have always had issues with Swiss stop pads getting hot and grabby. With various cork pads they wear fast but don't seem to hold heat like other compounds. The other drawback is that a straight cork pad is usually pretty poor in rain... But I guess the new Zipp pads fix this...
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cswi9367
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by cswi9367

my zipp cork pads keep the rim cool , and also less grabby than the reynolds pads.

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Gearjunkie
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by Gearjunkie

I've found the Tangente pads to be much less grabby than Swisstop Yellows, so generally nicer to use.

That said, on the really steep long descents (the ones where EVERYONE has to brake plenty), the Zipps can burn and they don't have quite the stopping power I'd like. So for those conditions, the Swisstops can be a better chocie, though you need to be more careful to modulate your braking, to avoid lock ups.

A compromise is to use Swisstops on the front (where most braking power is needed on the steep stuff) and Tangente on the rear (to avoid rear lock ups).

8)

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CharlesM
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by CharlesM

Gear I would say the exact opposite. I've now seen Yellows melt themselves to rims a couple of times. The Yellows are better than several older rubber-for-carbon pads but are not a better choice than the Tangente Cork or Baradine pads or Bontrager or D ace cork combo pads in most conditions and especially on long hard down hills.




OK, so I saw this yesterday and went home and put the Zipp wheels on the bike with Reynolds pads and the Reynolds strikes on the bike with Zipps pads.

For starters, Zipp cork pads are not just plain cork. They are like the Baradine...
Reynolds:
Image


Zipp (look more like cork, but when you touch em you cna feel they are no place near standard cork)


Image


Both are a mishmash composite like Bontrager / Duraace pads that I have said in the past are now my prefere pads over Swiss Yellow.


Anyhoo, the zipp wheels have a different braking surface than Reynolds and they tend to have better braking power but also chew up pad material faster... The Tangente pads work well on Reynolds and the reynolds work well on Zipp. The "feel" is a bit like the reynolds chew up faster, but as I just rode em each for 10 minutes on my mini Crit course and then swapped back for 10 minutes each, I would say they both perform pretty well. The Reynolds can be a little more statchy but have a bit more bite than the Zipps too.

It was 80 degrees or so and neither were heating things up in any odd fashion and I rode the brakes for a couple minutes with each on each wheel at the end of each ride.


I would add the Tangente and Baradine pads to the Bontrager and D ace combo material pads as my pref pads for carbon right now... Theyr'e both very good.

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Danton
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by Danton

aeroslave wrote:Is it ok to use the standard Reynolds carbon specific baradine brake pads with my Zipp 808 OR do I need to buy specific Zipp pads?

All good points made above but to answer your question, yes Reynolds pads will be fine.

Too add to the noise above, I still like the Swiss yellows. I suppose it depends on your braking style, mine is to brake hard for a short moment, not to hold the pad on the rim for a long time. Like this there is less heat build up and the Swiss yellows offer a good grab on the rim. I will try the Baradine Reynolds soon for comparison.

Johnny Rad
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by Johnny Rad

Ride report: I've been riding the Zipp Tangente cork-ish pads for over two weeks now and I'm going back to Swisstop Yellows.

Pros - The Zipps were 17g less than my partially used Swisstop Yellows. The Zipps didn't squeal at all whereas the Yellows won't stop squealing under hard and long braking.

Cons - The Zipps just didn't have the same stopping power; good enough on the flats I suppose, but noticeably less than Yellows. Specifically, I tested them on a downhill stretch of road with the rear brake only. With the Zipps, the rear didn't slow me; I had to use the front to slow my descent. With the Yellows, I slowed slightly with the rear brake only. I tried my experiment with both wheelsets and both sets of pads with similar results. Also, the front Zipp pads shuddered under hard braking at speed whereas the Yellows never did.

Background - Brakes are SRAM Red. Wheels are Reynolds Assaults and Attacks (both are carbon clinchers). Both Zipp and Yellow pads were toed in (front and rear). I'm 77kg.
Last edited by Johnny Rad on Mon May 24, 2010 6:41 pm, edited 5 times in total.

by Weenie


wasfast
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by wasfast

I use SS Yellow on with my various Reynolds DV46C's & Strikes. The squealing isn't just with these wheels, I've had it with others as well. Toeing the shoes is the only way I've been able to stop the squealing. They are very quiet on the Reynolds other than the slight "whirling" sound due to the scrim molded into the braking surface.

The SS wear fairly quickly as well. I have a new set of the Reynolds pads that came with the Strikes but haven't used them yet.

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