For Age 55+ WWs and Wannabes

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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Fourthbook
Posts: 256
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 2:11 pm
Location: Columbus, Ohio

by Fourthbook

Any interest in a tread focused on the wants/needs of we aging Weight Weenies and wannabes? I offer two thoughts (for what little they might be worth or of interest):

While my general riding condition, flexibility and endurance haven't changed much since turning 55 nearly 5 years ago, my maximum cardio/vascular limit (anaerobic threshold) seems to have declined; hence I can't jump on it as hard or for as long as in decades past. My off-season/winter conditioning is going to focus on that and maximum power output instead of general conditioning. What changes in conditioning are you fellow seniors experiencing and how are you compensating?

And, more relevant to the forum's general focus, have your WW preferences been effected by age-related changes in conditioning or riding practices? Is lighter (al)most always better as one ages? Do you focus on fine-tuning different components on your bike now than you did in earlier years?

Well, we may not be as fast/strong/bold but at least we'll still on the road!!!
Last edited by Fourthbook on Fri Dec 02, 2011 3:51 am, edited 2 times in total.
Wilier Cento1 SR
13.10 lbs (5.95 kgs) w/Enve 3.4-Tune 70/170 & Conti Competitions tubulars
12.53 lbs (5.68 kgs) w/FarSports 24-Extralite & Vittoria CX EVO II tubulars

by Weenie


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kac
Posts: 361
Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 5:31 pm

by kac

Very interested, but only if its not called "senior": that's too depressing!

KAC (age 58 as of 3 days ago...sob, sob, sob)

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Fourthbook
Posts: 256
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 2:11 pm
Location: Columbus, Ohio

by Fourthbook

I agree: 'senior' is a bit senile. How about "boomer", although I suppose most of us will be slightly younger than true boomers, but at least we know what it refers to...
Wilier Cento1 SR
13.10 lbs (5.95 kgs) w/Enve 3.4-Tune 70/170 & Conti Competitions tubulars
12.53 lbs (5.68 kgs) w/FarSports 24-Extralite & Vittoria CX EVO II tubulars

taina
Posts: 115
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:17 pm
Location: near Seattle

by taina

As an old man, "old" sounds better to me than "senior" or "boomer." Euphemisms age fast, and become terms for which new euphemisms are sought. Also, there's nothing wrong with being old. No euphemism is needed.

I've exercised regularly all my life, but re-started cycling only about 18 months ago. For me, it's not a question of maintenance but of rate of improvement. (If I maintain my current rate, I'll be ready for the Tour de France when I'm 86. Just kidding.) Cadence is increasing, speed is increasing, hills are getting easier. Saddle goes higher, handlebars go lower. It feels like the limits have much more to do with work ethic than with physical decline.

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Fourthbook
Posts: 256
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 2:11 pm
Location: Columbus, Ohio

by Fourthbook

OK, no labels at all other than the bare facts... how's that?
Wilier Cento1 SR
13.10 lbs (5.95 kgs) w/Enve 3.4-Tune 70/170 & Conti Competitions tubulars
12.53 lbs (5.68 kgs) w/FarSports 24-Extralite & Vittoria CX EVO II tubulars

taina
Posts: 115
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:17 pm
Location: near Seattle

by taina

Perfect. I especially like the scope ambiguity of "wannabe" (wannabe ww versus wannabe age 55+ ww).
Saura mon coeur que mon cul poise.

adapted from Rabelais

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Tapeworm
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Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 10:39 am

by Tapeworm

Whilst not as... experienced:D... as some here the general rule of thumb is that intensity can still be high but volume will decrease with age.

Note that intensity is relative and decrease does not mean "none". There is a decline in your genetic limit with age but very few ever get to that point ever, and the more you exercise this limits any decline and for those coming to the sport later in life or that suddenly have way more free time can experience a far greater level of fitness than ever before.

I know a certain Masters National Champ revealed in zooming by the younger guys in TTs shouting "C'mon, see I'm just an old man" laughing as he spun off.
"Physiology is all just propaganda and lies... all waiting to be disproven by the next study."
"I'm not a real doctor; But I am a real worm; I am an actual worm." - TMBG

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Juanmoretime
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Location: Urbana, Illinois

by Juanmoretime

As one ages if you still want to go fast you train just as hard. The recovery time you need to be able to go fast increases with each passing year so you must pick the times such as races when its critical for you to do well. I rode my personal best in the time trial at age 53 and while close this year, I had several injuries preventing me from training the way I really wanted to train, I plan to break that next year at the age of 55.

Sooner or later the clock catches up but I hope the downturn doesn't start for at least a couple of more years.
RESIDENT GRUMPY OLD MAN.

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Rick
Posts: 2004
Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2009 4:30 pm

by Rick

I'm 60.
I didn't start racing until I was 32, although I rode quite a bit before that.
I raced for about 14 years, and was a Cat 3. I always did better in very long races. In those days, over the years I finally came to the conclusion that more training is always better, and lighter weight is always better.
Then I took about 15 years off, although I did continue to exercise and ride; I just never went to any competive events. I also gained a lot of weight.
So, since I came back to "serous" training, (as serious as it ever gets for me anyway) I tried to be more "scientific" about the whole thing. Shorter, more intense, plenty of rest days, etc.....It didn't seem to work all that well.
So I just seem to be relearning the simple training dictums: More is better. Lighter is better.
If you train a ridiculous amount of miles, and starve yourself until you are constantly light-headed and look like Mahatma Gandhi after a fast, you will be able to climb like a scalded monkey!!!!

Just my opinion. I know it is a "minority opinion" in the modern era of scientific training. :)

Luckily, I still seem to be able to train and push just as hard as ever (perceived effort anyway). I am limited by the amount of time I am WILLING to devote to training, not because have found the optimum amount. I was doing 250-400 miles a week in the summer.

tomp
Posts: 146
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:02 pm

by tomp

Very interested in this topic and have studied in moderately. From what I have read and experienced I think there are a couple of key elements, FWIW.

1. Weight training. For me I work upper body and core. Squats hurt my back so I ride a fixed gear bike for my "leg work-out". Personally I don't think you can be too strong or be too flexible (next on the list).

2. Flexibility. If for nothing else it just feels good, but I do really believe it allows for maximum transfer of muscle strength.

3. Rest. Often overlooked, but so needed as this is when our bodies actually build up.

4. I'm still a believer in long moderately hard rides with mixed intervals interspersed and lots of climbing.

5. Frequency. Riding four times a week.

6. Cross training. Includes strength training, hiking and / or running, maybe some Yoga if that's your thing for strength and flexibility, or swimming.

7. Once weekly hard intervals.

I would be very interested to hear other peoples specifics.

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Fourthbook
Posts: 256
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 2:11 pm
Location: Columbus, Ohio

by Fourthbook

Wilier Cento1 SR
13.10 lbs (5.95 kgs) w/Enve 3.4-Tune 70/170 & Conti Competitions tubulars
12.53 lbs (5.68 kgs) w/FarSports 24-Extralite & Vittoria CX EVO II tubulars

by Weenie


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