HOT: Active* forum members generally gain 5% discount at starbike.com store!
Weight Weenies
* FAQ    * Search    * Trending Topics
* Login   * Register
HOME Listings Articles FAQ Contact About




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 9:54 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:45 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Ireland
Anyone doing any winter training on a fixed gear?

Due to some crack-related chain-stay unpleasantness I am without my road bike for a while so I'm having to do more training on my humble cannondale capo. I have a TT bike too but I find it hard to do long steady mileage on that - it's really better for tempo or harder efforts.

I'm trying to figure out what kind of gearing I would be best using. Spin spin spin? Or HTFU and stick a big gear on, grind my way over those rises? Strength or souplesse?


Top
 Profile  
 
Posted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 9:54 am 


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 12:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 4:32 pm
Posts: 132
Location: UK
I used a Kona Band Wagon for the majority of my winter training last year. I found the stock gear of 42x16 worked pretty well for most rides. Had to swap the wheel round to singlespeed for hilly group rides, otherwise I would be miles behind at the bottom of some descents. The gear can get a bit spinny at speed though and you find yourself sprinting onto a wheel and sticking really close on descents to avoid pedalling.
The bike was also a bit limiting in the early spring when I wanted to start doing intervals.

This year I am using the same bike but mainly singlespeed - a bit less of a killer after 70 miles!
Also plan to get a set of rollers when the weather gets icy to give me a propper workout at home.

_________________
http://www.shinycufflinks.co.uk
Dura Ace, Campagnolo Record and SRAM Cufflinks


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 1:20 pm 
Offline
Formerly known as wassertreter

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 8:08 am
Posts: 2013
Location: Pedal Square
Not what you asked for, but would a higher stem on the TT bike be an option, for a more relaxed position allowing for longer miles?

_________________
Bikes: Raw Ti, 650b flatbar CX


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 4:08 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:45 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Ireland
I've done a couple of 100k+ rides on the fixie now. I have to say I feel it in the legs significantly more than the same kind of spin on the road bike. I'm using 48x17 which I suspect might be a little big. I feel like I'm spending too much time turning the cranks at lass than 80rpm (hey, I'm trying to build the base at the moment so I'm not exactly setting any speed records). I might try 48x18 next time. Spin, spin, spin (until the hills anyway).

I certainly won't be using it for club spins. There's no way I'd be anything other than a liability every time the road heads downhill. Maybe my technique will improve as I do more but at the moment I'm getting a bit bouncy in the saddle once I get above maybe 55kph.

As for adapting the TT bike, well, it's more the saddle position than the bars that's the issue - I'm right up against what the commisaires would allow. It's fine once you're laying the power down but when riding Z2 or whatever there's too much weight on the saddle for the undercarriage to bear.

Oh, and I've picked out a nice new road frame so soon this fixie thing will be voluntary rather than being the only option. I think I'll keep it up mind you. The new bike frame will likely be too precious to use on all but reasonably fine days.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2006 6:35 am
Posts: 5020
Location: New York
I ride a fixed with 53x18. That gear is good for flat and moderate hills between 1%-5% since this is where I live. I do use it on shorter steeper hills as well. The thing about the fixed and hill climbing is that it is easier than one might think in that the momentum of the pedal stroke helps you move forward for the next stroke. Ideally one would have suitable cogs for the course they are about to do. The 53x18 or a gear that yields similar gear inches is ideal in keeping 90 rpm (the most efficient cadence) for rolling hill routes. But ultimately it's the rider that determines the gear they want to use. I suggest you take a look at a gear calculator and experiment with a few gears on the road bike and find one that you use most for the given road you ride.

_________________
I never took drugs to improve my performance at any time. I will be willing to stick my finger into a polygraph test if anyone with big media pull wants to take issue. If you buy a signed poster now it will not be tarnished later. --Graeme Obree


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2011 9:31 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 05, 2009 11:20 am
Posts: 1355
Its good for building your base and pedalling technique. Overall I would advise you do flatter routes and specifically go for a slightly spinnier gear. You'll be better for it in the end.

_________________
"Step forward the climber and all those who worship at the altar of lightness" - R. Millar


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 1:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2004 6:21 pm
Posts: 1524
Location: around Paris
As Fettling, I had a 42x16 too.
Spinning on the flat and, if not really low rpm, was quite demanding for off-season climbing.

BTW, have a question. I was using a road bike with the rear derailleur as chain "tensionner" but I felt that it was not as good as a track bike, because when I was trying to use "engine brake", the chain was losing tension. Not as direct as a real fixie.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 9:20 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 05, 2009 11:20 am
Posts: 1355
You really shouldn't be riding fixed gear with any sort of tensioner and if you are most definitely not braking by resisting the pedals as that will cause the chain to come off.

Get a wheel built up with a White Industries Eno hub.

_________________
"Step forward the climber and all those who worship at the altar of lightness" - R. Millar


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 9:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 10:39 am
Posts: 2348
niceonetom wrote:
Anyone doing any winter training on a fixed gear?


Yes, its called "track cycling". :mrgreen:

But seriously, some of the best training/racing you can do, at least in terms of intensity.

_________________
"Physiology is all just propaganda and lies... all waiting to be disproven by the next study."
"I'm not a real doctor; But I am a real worm; I am an actual worm." - TMBG


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 9:52 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:32 pm
Posts: 7412
Location: Los Angeles / Glendale, California
I used to train a lot of a fixed-wheel rig. After a while I noticed that despite learning my legs into a smooth pedaling technique, I also acquired a "lazy stroke" and spoke to a coach about this.

He recommended single-speed w/computer instead of fixed-wheel. The single gearing forces use of a smooth pedal stroke as necessary for the terrain (paying attention go to the telemetry, keeping a steady speed, hr, whatever) and forcing the legs to adapt to a full stroke all the way through the turn of the crank. Because a fixed-set up has the cranks turning with the motion of the bike, there is a tendency for a rider to un-consciously relax their stroke prematurely (especially on the upwards portion of the stroke).

I switched to a SS set up. Much, much better - it allowed me to take on all the terrain available to me (including massive hills and descents) while forcing a solitary gearing. I got rid of that 'lazy stroke' as well.

Just an alternate perspective on this.

_________________
Exp001 || TeamLACBC


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2004 6:21 pm
Posts: 1524
Location: around Paris
You are perfectly right and that makes sense, the inertia/momentum of a fixie forces you to pedal but lot of time without producing 'torque' all the way.
And it is safer in downhill curves.

PS: i'd like to try Powercranks, must be a torture
PS2: Agree on the track thing. Makesgreat road racer. But you have to got one in the neighborhood.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:32 pm
Posts: 7412
Location: Los Angeles / Glendale, California
I'll note that I started out training with the Fixed-Wheel (Fixed Gear) set up, but switched over to single-speed when it was clear that I had acquired the lazy stroke but already benefitted from learning the smooth motion with the fixed.

By the way, that coach said that essentially this will happen to everyone riding fixed who is not specifically training for track racing, but a lot of people don't catch it or realize that they have stopped benefitting from the fixed wheel training.

_________________
Exp001 || TeamLACBC


Top
 Profile  
 
Posted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:03 pm 


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 10:06 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:45 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Ireland
Interesting input. Thanks all.

I've got a new road bike now so I'm not obliged to stay on the fixie. Obviously I'm a little precious about the new steed though, so I don't want to spend the whole winter thrashing it across the rutted roads of rural Ireland - the fixie will still be getting a lot of use I think.

My endurance weekend spins will still be on the geared bike but all of it in the 39 - I'm under instructions to keep my gearing choice very narrow (39x15 to 39x17) so spinning on the flat and grinding on the steeper climbs. The fixie is an even more exaggerated form of that kind of riding I guess. I'll be careful to not get too used to the momentum pulling me through the deadspot and end up with "lazy stroke".

As for track racing, well, our one and only track is outdoor and sees no action at all this time of year. I've done the accreditation and am licensed to race but have never bothered. I'd like to get into it but it doesn't really mesh with my other goals for the year.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: stuartrc and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

   Similar Topics   Author   Replies   Views   Last post 
There are no new unread posts for this topic. 24h fixed gear hub

in Everything wheels

vala

8

242

Wed Aug 06, 2014 5:44 am

Thuekr View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. REV-L Carbon brakes $215 pics fixed :)

in For sale - Pictures are mandatory 22-3-13

theremery

0

298

Fri Aug 15, 2014 10:46 am

theremery View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. Silver Stealth Fixed -completed @4.94kg

[ Go to page: 1, 2 ]

in Introduce Yourself / Gallery - Please use metric weights.

pam

15

3919

Sun Jun 22, 2014 12:10 am

pam View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. Single speed / fixed gear carbon disc cyclocross frame?

in Cyclocross / Touring

px

11

1278

Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:31 am

jooo View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. Fixed my problem with 11 speed on a 10 speed freewheel

[ Go to page: 1, 2 ]

in Road

lannes

22

2910

Fri Jun 27, 2014 10:13 pm

5 8 5 View the latest post


It is currently Wed Nov 26, 2014 11:09 pm

All times are UTC + 1 hour




Advertising   –  FAQ   –  Contact   –  Convert   –  About

© Weight Weenies 2000-2013
hosted by starbike.com


How to get rid of these ads? Just register!


Powered by phpBB