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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 10:20 pm 
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I've been reading/skimming the "Training with a Power Meter" book. I absolutely love it, but I have noticed there really isn't a lot in the book to give you good direction onto setting up your annual routine. It gives a lot of great workouts, and does a good job explaining performance, but I was hoping it would tell me how to setup a monthly routine working up to race season. I also read Friel's book, but I didn't really learn a lot from that one. Most of the book seemed like common sense if you had any sort of physiology background already.

Does anyone know of good book that delves into setting up a workouts based on past performance and aspirations for future performance?

I am still quite hesitant to cough up 150 a month for online coaching. My friend does coaching through that fascat program, and loves it, but 150 seems pretty steep for just spending a hour or two a month setting up a schedule. I may cave in though if I can't find any other resources...


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Posted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 10:20 pm 


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 10:41 pm 
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One the most oft overlooked aspects for the beginner is the premise of linear adaptation. When starting structured training the structure does not need to be complex in the slightest. Consistency is usually the biggest hurdle for most.

Of course giving someone the same series of sessions for 16weeks makes it difficult to justify a high cost.

If you search in this thread you will some examples of a week program I have drafted.

Using a simple linear progression you do the same program week in, week out. Test every month. If you fail to show improvement THEN you need to alter the program and introduce more complex periodisation and cycles. I have seen many improve a great deal by doing a very simple program HOWEVER they rested well and were consistent - 2 aspects which can be difficult for those with work/family commitments.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:22 am 
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This is the closest thread I could find of yours, is this the one?
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=98416&hilit=+week

What about recovery months, and still maintaining a good aerobic base through them?

What about working up your anaerobic base as you near the races you want to peak for? To my knowledge when you "up" your intensity 25%, you power will go up a reasonable percentage, but you can only maintain both for a short window.

What about emphasizing on the weaknesses, while not overtraining them?

Some of the very "gross" copies I have seen online incorporate recovery weeks every 4-5 weeks, and leave at least 3 months of purely z2-z3 work (usually during the winter time) for recovery.

I understand the rationality of your method, but I would think you could easily overtrain it if you use an intense workout week-in and week-out.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 2:32 am 
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Thread here:-
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=99498

What's a recovery month?? Recovery from what?

No such thing as an anaerobic base.

If you have identified weakness then these should be addressed. However, once again when starting the weaknesses are usually overall fitness. There is no point having a "5min power focus" if your FTP is only 3 watts per kilo.

The old "have easy base miles over winter" is applicable IF - you have done 20,000km for the year already and can actually DO slow base kms in winter. For the amateur - complete waste of time. Easy period within the training cycle - yes.

Over-training can occur on any programme. But that is why adequate rest is always factored in. With the "repeating week" that I posted above there should not be enough strain to cause overtraining, rather as progression occurs under training would be more likely and hence the regular testing.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 2:59 am 
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Maybe I'm miseducated on this fact...

Since you don't believe in "anaerobic base," what do call your bodies ability to recover quicker between intervals as you get better at intervals?

(e.g. 2*(3x2m) with 2min RI between each interval, and 5 minutes between each set)

The other two facts makes sense.

One other thing though, when they professional riders are building their annual workout around particular events, what exactly are they doing? I thought they greatly increase they intensity of their workouts as they near their desired event?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 4:23 am 
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The ability of the anaerobic system to recover is not altered that much though training nor is it capacity. What can be elicited is the amount of power you get from that energy system for the given time and the amount of contribution the aerobic system adds to that. For example: in a 600watt 30 sec effort a rider with a FTP of 250watts will require a greater anaerobic contribution than a rider with FTP of 400watt FTP. Other factors are at play such as VO2max. If you do a true 30sec anaerobic effort no amount of conditioning will allow anything more than vomit and stars to be seen.

Real pros don't have an off season. Maybe a few weeks of serious coffee rides, some S&C work then back to work. This applies more so to an amateur who needs a much lesser time to recover from the relative load.

"Pro example": Emma Pooley leaves the Euro winter and comes to Perth WA and races times trials. Same for the Brit track team.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 4:53 am 
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I have been doing a simple routine I found from Tapeworm for a few weeks and love it! I feel great and the variety through the week makes my time on the trainer (foul weather outside) much more bareable.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 6:28 am 
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Location: Geeeelong!
Tapeworm knows his onion.

This I can assure all :thumbup:

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 2:15 pm 
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http://velodynamics2.webs.com/rcgtp1.pdf


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 7:06 pm 
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The link doesn't load, what is it?

Btw, thanks for the thorough replies, Tapeworm.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 7:37 pm 
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Yeah, sorry. It once worked.

This..

http://www.freewebs.com/guidepreview/RCGTP1.pdf

:beerchug:


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 9:08 pm 
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phourgenres wrote:
Maybe I'm miseducated on this fact...

Since you don't believe in "anaerobic base," what do call your bodies ability to recover quicker between intervals as you get better at intervals?

(e.g. 2*(3x2m) with 2min RI between each interval, and 5 minutes between each set)



Your ability to recover between intervals of any kind is a function of your aerobic capacity (e.g. your FTP).
Increasing your "anaerobic work capacity" (AWC) will allow you to dig deep for short periods putting you in severe oxygen debt, but at some point you will need to repay that debt and that recovery can only come from aerobic sources not from your AWC, otherwise you'd be just digging yourself a deeper hole and never recover IOW you'd be dead from oxygen starvation.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 10:53 pm 
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@ Tabe - Awesome document, thanks for posting.

@ Aussiebullet - better explaination than mine, thanks :thumbup:

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2012 1:40 pm 
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Location: Australia
phourgenres wrote:
I've been reading/skimming the "Training with a Power Meter" book. I absolutely love it, but I have noticed there really isn't a lot in the book to give you good direction onto setting up your annual routine. It gives a lot of great workouts, and does a good job explaining performance, but I was hoping it would tell me how to setup a monthly routine working up to race season. I also read Friel's book, but I didn't really learn a lot from that one. Most of the book seemed like common sense if you had any sort of physiology background already.

Does anyone know of good book that delves into setting up a workouts based on past performance and aspirations for future performance?

I am still quite hesitant to cough up 150 a month for online coaching. My friend does coaching through that fascat program, and loves it, but 150 seems pretty steep for just spending a hour or two a month setting up a schedule. I may cave in though if I can't find any other resources...



Some thoughts...

Assuming you're fit, heathly and have no medical condition not to train then:

If you have the book then the best thing you can do is read it properly not skim it. Once you have read it, read it again.

While it doesn't say if your weakness is x and you want to get to y then do z, it gives an idea of how to identify your strengths and weaknesses and then gives workouts you can include into your training plan to address those weaknesses. The 2 sample plans/case studies give you an idea of how to address weaknesses.

Also the chapter on training load gives you an idea of how to increase your training load gradually.

First thing I find when setting any plan is to set an acheivable goal, whether it's a race, do a ride in a certain time or whatever, it gives you a target to aim at and work backwards from there.

As far as rest weeks/months go, some people include them some people don't, there are probably studies that suggest both work but each to their own. If after a few solid weeks of training you feel tired/sick/drained mentally or physically then if you feel like it have a break. If you feel good then keep training and see how your body responds. A coach at the other end of an internet connection won't know how you will respond to training necessarily when they are designing your plan (depending on the coaching plan etc).

The most important thing to remember is that no 1 plan or method will suit everyone, so if you're interested in physiology and training and want to know more then have a go at designing your own plan. If you would rather not know then pay a coach.


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Posted: Thu Mar 15, 2012 1:40 pm 


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2012 3:18 am 
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Tabe, thanks for the link. I skimmed through the charts, and that is just what I was looking for. When I get some time I will have to thoroughly read it all.


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