Wireless Di2

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Geoff
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by Geoff


Broady
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by Broady

SRAM have a patent on wireless shifting apparently. Gotta think they'll do something big (wireless) for DA10000

by Weenie


Geoff
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by Geoff

So interesting. I have been after a SRAM Etap, but Katusha does not control the bikes, Canyon does.

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TonyM
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by TonyM

Geoff wrote:
Wed Mar 21, 2018 1:52 pm
Yet more Patent speculation: https://www.bikeradar.com/road/news/art ... ess-51967/
Wireless would be fine. Maybe.

But getting power for it and for lights etc.. viathe road buzz that would be very cool :thumbup:

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

Broady wrote:
Wed Mar 21, 2018 2:45 pm
SRAM have a patent on wireless shifting apparently. Gotta think they'll do something big (wireless) for DA10000
SRAM has a patent on eTap-style paddle shifting, which is why Shimano must continue to use four-button shifting or push Synchro-Shift. Mimicking the STI brake lever system is a step backward. IMO a brake lever that pivots around a single axis is better than one that can pivot around two...it’s just a much more reassuring feeling in the hand. Shimano would be much better off using thumb triggers like Campy’s for one pair of buttons.

SRAM also has patented derailleur battery mounting. This is why FSA’s WE groupset has a central battery and wires running to both derailleurs. This is also why Shimano is doing all kinds of funky things with energy recovery. Shimano has developed a jockey wheel dynamo to power future rear derailleurs.

Honestly SRAM has got the wireless groupset market cornered for some time with just these two patents, let alone a couple other even more technical ones.

mrlobber
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by mrlobber

Personally I would totally like the centrally wired derailleur + wireless shifters system and, if I remember, Shimano even had some similar Di2 drawings patented a while ago (it was posted here on WW as well, I think). That system also would have an opportunity for partial upgrades where, by adding "wireless-enabled-battery", you could just change shifters and continue using older derailleurs, although I'm not so sure it is an advantage from manufacturer's sales point of view :D

pdlpsher1
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by pdlpsher1

I really do like the new shifters. I wear lobster gloves in the winter and shifting a Di2 system with thick gloves is a chore.

I don’t think a wireless system adds any value other than a slightly shorter installation time. I’m using the Di2 bar end junction box and my front end is relatively clean with it. I like the convenience of a central battery. The large central Di2 battery lasts ages. With the eTap I have to worry about a total of four batteries. Imagine a ProTour team with fifty or more bikes. 50 x 4 = 200 batteries to keep track of.


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TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

Then again if for some reason a battery dies in the middlle of a stage, a Katusha-Alpecin mechanic can install a new battery in seconds rather than grab the spare bike off the roof. I know Gerard Vroomen vastly prefers eTap because he hates drilling holes in the frames he designs.

Di2 buttons are bad now, but going back to a “wobbly” brake lever is a step sideways. Surely they can think of something better? Di2 already has extra programmable buttons. I know people who have used etube to mimic eTap paddle shifting with the “lever” buttons and the buttons on the hoods perform a front shift.

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IrrelevantD
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by IrrelevantD

I don't get the "wobbly brake lever" bit. I switch back and forth between 6870 on my Allez Sprint, and 6800 on my Crockett a few times a week and have zero issue with the brake lever itself. The last 3-4 generations of the STI levers have felt pretty good to me. I think the last one that felt in any way "wobly" to me was the 6500. My biggest problem is trying to push the actual lever to shift for the first couple of shifts when I go back to the Di2. If I'm being completely honest, my biggest problem is where I put the sprint buttons and accidently shifting into bigger cogs when I'm not expecting it.

While I really don't care either way, becauase I haven't had any issues with the Di2 buttons, even with thick gloves, going back to the old way would make switching between bikes easier for me until we get to the point where mechanical shifting just doesn't exist anymore.
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by Weenie


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