DI2 suddenly stopped working???

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cunn1n9
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Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:24 am

by cunn1n9

On a long ride right towards the end (luckily) my di2 suddenly stopped shifting leaving me in small chainring and in middle of cassette. I could not get it to shift. Next day it worked again but showed under 25% charge left (green flashing status light).

Only thing I can think of it was very hot (over 42* C). Perhaps the battery played up. Battery wasn’t flat though as next day it work. I had fully charged the battery 500kms before this so should have had plenty of charge and actually much more than 25% left. I am in Australia and had done 3 rides in a row in very high heat.

Anyone ever seen anything like this before?


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by Weenie


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prendrefeu
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by prendrefeu

cunn1n9 wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:46 pm
Only thing I can think of it was very hot (over 42* C).
As stated in the manual, the operating range of the battery maxes at 50°C. Considering the ambient temperature is over 42°C, it is highly likely that the temperature closer/at the asphalt level would be in excess of 50°C.

Usually electronics with batteries have mechanisms to protect the components from overheating, so they essentially 'shut down' until the temperature of the components have fallen back into operable ranges.

This applies to all batteries: the closer the temperature is to the limits of the operable temperature range the quicker the battery will drain energy.
Any, and all, 'battery life' estimates are estimates based on ideal operating conditions (ie, middle of the range)
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IrrelevantD
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by IrrelevantD

prendrefeu wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:52 pm
cunn1n9 wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:46 pm
Only thing I can think of it was very hot (over 42* C).
As stated in the manual, the operating range of the battery maxes at 50°C. Considering the ambient temperature is over 42°C, it is highly likely that the temperature closer/at the asphalt level would be in excess of 50°C.

Usually electronics with batteries have mechanisms to protect the components from overheating, so they essentially 'shut down' until the temperature of the components have fallen back into operable ranges.

This applies to all batteries: the closer the temperature is to the limits of the operable temperature range the quicker the battery will drain energy.
Any, and all, 'battery life' estimates are estimates based on ideal operating conditions (ie, middle of the range)
+1

This was my thought as well. If it's an internal battery, being in the seat tube could have insulated the heat being put out by the battery itself and combined with the already hot ambient temps pushed it past it's limit.
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pdlpsher1
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by pdlpsher1

The recently ended TDU had some pretty extreme temperatures. I didn't recall reading about any issues related to the Di2 batteries. Personally I've not experienced any issues related to a battery issue due to heat. I'd be interested to find out if the heat is a culprit.

ps it would be interesting to test the theory as it would be easy to duplicate the issue. Just remove the battery and warm it up. However I'm not going to volunteer to do the test.

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Conza
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by Conza

prendrefeu wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:52 pm
cunn1n9 wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:46 pm
Only thing I can think of it was very hot (over 42* C).
As stated in the manual, the operating range of the battery maxes at 50°C. Considering the ambient temperature is over 42°C, it is highly likely that the temperature closer/at the asphalt level would be in excess of 50°C.

Usually electronics with batteries have mechanisms to protect the components from overheating, so they essentially 'shut down' until the temperature of the components have fallen back into operable ranges.

This applies to all batteries: the closer the temperature is to the limits of the operable temperature range the quicker the battery will drain energy.
Any, and all, 'battery life' estimates are estimates based on ideal operating conditions (ie, middle of the range)
So... when I do the Alpine Classic this Friday (250km, 5,200m vert) at 38C, if my Di2 stops working I atleast know why...

:shock: -> :lol: -> :cry:
It's all about the adventure :o .

mattr
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by mattr

pdlpsher1 wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 12:10 am
The recently ended TDU had some pretty extreme temperatures. I didn't recall reading about any issues related to the Di2 batteries. Personally I've not experienced any issues related to a battery issue due to heat. I'd be interested to find out if the heat is a culprit.

ps it would be interesting to test the theory as it would be easy to duplicate the issue. Just remove the battery and warm it up. However I'm not going to volunteer to do the test.
Don't most (?) protour teams use external junction boxes/batteries for access/serviceability? Not having the battery in a metal or carbon tube will help quite a bit. Plus you'll get more cooling travelling at protour speeds (And less shifting)

BdaGhisallo
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by BdaGhisallo

mattr wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 10:27 am
pdlpsher1 wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 12:10 am
The recently ended TDU had some pretty extreme temperatures. I didn't recall reading about any issues related to the Di2 batteries. Personally I've not experienced any issues related to a battery issue due to heat. I'd be interested to find out if the heat is a culprit.

ps it would be interesting to test the theory as it would be easy to duplicate the issue. Just remove the battery and warm it up. However I'm not going to volunteer to do the test.
Don't most (?) protour teams use external junction boxes/batteries for access/serviceability? Not having the battery in a metal or carbon tube will help quite a bit. Plus you'll get more cooling travelling at protour speeds (And less shifting)
Most have been sticking with the external A junction box, usually under the stem, since it's simple and ever so easy to access if there's an issue. However, I haven't seen an external battery in quite a while on their bikes. Tucking it in the seat post is a pretty simple solution too and it's easy to access if there is an issue.

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jekyll man
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by jekyll man

Cyclespeed had a similar issue:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=145089
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cunn1n9
Posts: 72
Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:24 am

by cunn1n9

Thanks for your help. The temperature that day was a furnace so sounds like heat related. Battery is in seatpost with bubble wrap holding it in. Bike is black so perhaps it was getting a little cooked inside...


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TurboKoo
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by TurboKoo

Bubble wrap is not a good thing. You should leave at least 50mm free in the middl to avoid overheating
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mattr
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by mattr

I wonder if a couple of blocks of high density foam, cut to fit between battery and ID of seat tube would work better.
Just supporting the battery at the ends, and maybe in the middle.

Plenty of 3D printed options about as well......

by Weenie


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