New Frameset: Decisions, decisions...

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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kgt
Posts: 6717
Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 10:29 am
Location: Athens, Greece

by kgt

If you love the C59 but want something stiffer then C60 is the obvious choice. THere are many posts comparing the two of them. Some people prefer the C60 some others the C59.

by Weenie


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thestedmans82
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2017 1:07 am

by thestedmans82

C60 is an awesome bike - if you want stiff and surefooted sure there is s slight weight penalty and clearance is tight so max 25mm but get a test ride and see how it compares to c59


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Mockenrue
Posts: 377
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 10:32 am
Location: UK

by Mockenrue

I own several C59s and test rode a C60 earlier this summer. My first thoughts on the ride were 'C59 on steroids'; Colnago have improved on all the elements that made the C59 such a great bike without sacrificing anything.

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mrgray
Posts: 759
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 1:56 am

by mrgray

i have owned and ridden both the C59 and the C60. i'm a bit heavier than you. the c59 is, IMHO, near perfection re: stiffness. the C60 is stiffer. i'd say alot stiffer but i don't want to alarm you. and also i wouldn't say the c60 was too stiff (maybe for me it was, but probably not for everybody).

i would say that if you liked the 695 over the c59, then owning those 2 bikes you really were suffering an embarrassment of riches. as in you saying that makes me want to own a 695. because i fondly remember my c59 and am always looking for another one. i am not doing that with the c60 i sold.

i think you should buy the frame that excites you in some way, either due to tech in it or how it looks etc. most upper end bikes these days are plenty stiff i reckon. also it is a special gift so maybe don't get too practical about it. so which bike you've seen really floats the old boat?

also what about a time scylon? isn't that the logical progression from loving a look 695?

BTW - cool power numbers. hope i'm still riding and as fit as you when i'm 53 (and hope i'm retired then too :D )
Bobo S&S Steel Bike - 7.5 kg
Oltre XR2- 6.6 kg
Look 585 - 6.8 kg

vamoots58
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 1:46 am

by vamoots58

Well... As often happens with me and my very focused searches, I ended up making a decision... Ordered a Parlee Altum yesterday. My LBS is a Moots shop and as I was mulling the notion of an RSL he showed me a really great deal on an Altum that would afford me the option of essentially custom paint at a quite large discount from retail price. I did a quick test ride on one of the bikes he had built up in the shop and was really impressed with the stiffness and comfort of the bike, despite being a full size too small. Geometry-wise, the Altum is taller and shorter than I'm used to, but worked out the numbers and with stem rise and seat post setback, I can replicate the fit of my Look which I have really come to like. Thank you for all the contributed opinions, now is the hard part...waiting!!

Delorre
Posts: 867
Joined: Sat May 24, 2014 12:09 pm

by Delorre

vamoots58 wrote:Well... As often happens with me and my very focused searches, I ended up making a decision... Ordered a Parlee Altum yesterday. My LBS is a Moots shop and as I was mulling the notion of an RSL he showed me a really great deal on an Altum that would afford me the option of essentially custom paint at a quite large discount from retail price. I did a quick test ride on one of the bikes he had built up in the shop and was really impressed with the stiffness and comfort of the bike, despite being a full size too small. Geometry-wise, the Altum is taller and shorter than I'm used to, but worked out the numbers and with stem rise and seat post setback, I can replicate the fit of my Look which I have really come to like. Thank you for all the contributed opinions, now is the hard part...waiting!!


I don't understand people that mess with saddle setback (less or more) to compensate for a too long or too short frame. Frame setback is a fix thing, regardless of frame reach. Play with stem lenght and angle as much as you want (within limits), but keep your usual saddle setback!!

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

Delorre wrote:I don't understand people that mess with saddle setback (less or more) to compensate for a too long or too short frame. Frame setback is a fix thing, regardless of frame reach. Play with stem lenght and angle as much as you want (within limits), but keep your usual saddle setback!!


Hopefully it means he just needs a setback seatpost to achieve his normal saddle position. But yeah, saddle position is not something that changes unless crank length, shoe/pedal stack also changes.
Last edited by TobinHatesYou on Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Mr.Gib
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Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

vamoots58 wrote:Well... Ordered a Parlee Altum yesterday. Geometry-wise, the Altum is taller and shorter than I'm used to,


Nice choice. I've been on an Altum for a couple of seasons now. Liked it very much from the beginning but it has really grown on me. I continue to be very impressed by how light, stiff, and comfortable it is. Incredible climber, great to hammer on, and at the same time I can cruise all day (8 hours plus in the saddle) and never get that "wish I could get off my bike" feeling. Just a great combination of stiff and forgiving in all the right places. Loads of tire clearance also.

As for the geometry, it comes down to getting the right size. I run about 10 cm of drop on an ML with a longish (130 mm) stem slammed on the standard 15 mm headset cap. Exact same position I had on a variety of race bikes with more aggressive geometry.

One word of caution, the integrated seat post wedge clamp requires careful handling. It works well but is a minimalist design. Use carbon paste on the seatpost-seat tube interface, and grease on all the surfaces of the clamp and bolt except the knurled section of the clamp that presses up against the seat post. Then use a torque wrench and tighten the bolt to the max 8 nm. The problem is that the supplied bolt takes a 4 mm allen tool. 8 nm is a lot of torque for a 4 mm. You need a really good fresh allen tool to avoid stripping the bolt. Also because the bolt is close to the seatpost, its hard to angle to tool perfectly when tightening. I switched the stock bolt to a high quality stainless piece that takes a 5 mm tool.

Enjoy the ride and post some pics when she's built.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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