Trek Émonda 2018

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
MAsshole
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:08 am

by MAsshole

53x12 wrote:
MAsshole wrote:
53x12 wrote:
probertsqbe wrote:The cabling ruins the overall effect for me.

:?:

I think he means the Di2 cable (or what at least appears to be a Di2 cable) in the second picture looks bad.

I agree with that, but other than that it looks amazing.


You guys aren't following the details. "New vs. old."

:doh:

Yep. You're right.

by Weenie


Noctiluxx
Posts: 176
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2017 7:17 pm
Location: Southern California

by Noctiluxx

Before purchasing my 2017 TCR SL, i test rode the Emonda SLR and Tarmac S-Works. The Tarmac was super stiff though heavy. The Emonda is super light though flexy under heavy load. The TCR was as light as the Emonda and stiff as the Tarmac at a much better price.
2018 Bianchi Oltre XR4, (Celeste Matt)
2017 Giant TCR Advanced SL (Red)
2016 Specialized Allez DSW Sprint (Gold)
2016 Giant Anthem Advanced SX (FS)
2018 Trek Farley EX 9.8 Fatty (FS)
2017 Giant Toughroad (rigid 29er)

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TonyM
Posts: 1713
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

Will there be an Émonda disc version (like the Tarmac disc)?

spartan
Posts: 1078
Joined: Fri Sep 03, 2004 2:52 am

by spartan

according the UCI two new emonda frames were approved rim and disc version on the 18 emonda.

stay tune for th official release eom.

a lot of new bikes

cervelo r5, bmc slr, specialized tarmac, trek emonda, shimano ultegra 8x, colnago vr2
Current Rides:

2017 Giant TCR Advanced SL 0 DI2 9150

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TonyM
Posts: 1713
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

spartan wrote:according the UCI two new emonda frames were approved rim and disc version on the 18 emonda.

stay tune for th official release eom.

a lot of new bikes

cervelo r5, bmc slr, specialized tarmac, trek emonda, shimano ultegra 8x, colnago vr2


That's a good news!

I was actually planing to get a S-works Tarmac disc but I may consider the Émonda disc then.

jlok
Posts: 369
Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2015 3:30 am

by jlok

p3dalfaster wrote:
jlok wrote: then it will look clean!


My eyes are hardly being violated in it's current state ;)

Yep, but for top bikes we aim at marginal gain (or... Loss?) of every possible parameter.. I like the bike cant wait to see the DB version.

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hatsunagi
Posts: 25
Joined: Sat May 13, 2017 4:29 am

by hatsunagi

I cant see the difference.

Sent from my SM-G920K using Tapatalk

Lieblingsleguan
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2015 9:47 pm

by Lieblingsleguan

spartan wrote:according the UCI two new emonda frames were approved rim and disc version on the 18 emonda.

stay tune for th official release eom.

a lot of new bikes

cervelo r5, bmc slr, specialized tarmac, trek emonda, shimano ultegra 8x, colnago vr2

Lapierre Aircode

FIJIGabe
Posts: 1384
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 6:07 pm
Location: The Lone Star State

by FIJIGabe

congbab wrote:Madon is more desirable than emonda.


Really, based on what? I love my Madone, but when climbing, I'd much rather have a lighter Emonda.

Regarding why the junction port wasn't integrated into the frame, ala Domane and Madone, I would venture a guess that it has to do with the ultimate weight of the bike. Between the extra required bolts and the extra carbon needed to reinforce the area, Trek probably couldn't keep the weight down and made the decision to just provide an evolutionary update to the bike, rather than completely change it, and potentially add weight to a bike that's fighting to keep it off.
Madone 9 https://goo.gl/7UwZpV
Crockett https://goo.gl/f5PdCN
Madone 5 https://goo.gl/cMdyFo

Madone 4, Cobia. I own a lot of Treks.

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wheelsONfire
Posts: 1757
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2014 8:15 am
Location: NorthEU

by wheelsONfire

congbab wrote:Madon is more desirable than emonda.


If you don't want ISP and integrated parts, i would say Emonda is to prefer.
Bikes:

Ax Lightness Vial EVO D
Paduano Racing Fidia
Open *UP*
https://opencycle.com/showcase/the-xplo ... eelsonfire

jeffy
Posts: 1242
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2014 11:51 pm

by jeffy

Pokerface07 wrote:Disappointing they didn't integrate the junction box into the frame like on the Madone.


i read somewhere amongst this current reporting that the auction box is underneath downtube bidon cage.

will be interested to see if the entry point for the rear caliper hose is well placed for both moto and us brake configurations
(so the hose doesn't rub the paint)

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Calnago
Posts: 5302
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

The Emonda mechanical cable routing has been one of its strong points imo with that one little caveat of rear brake housing rub on the headtube when used with the common rear brake/right lever configuration. The reason it was like this was to avoid rattling of the cable inside the top tube due to the Emonda top tube shape, and angling the line of the cable from right entry to left exit was an easy way to avoid any internal contact with the sides of the top tube. But now they changed the exit point of the rear brake housing to exit from the center of the top tube versus more to the side, so because of the new angle they can now have the brake housing enter from the left side again, presumably with no rattling of cable on the inside of the top tube. I could see the right side entry as being preferable to those who run their rear brakes linked to the left lever, but that is not the most common routing worldwide.

jeffy
Posts: 1242
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2014 11:51 pm

by jeffy

if they have moved the brake/hose entry point forward it will be ok, i think the housing rub issue was because the entry point was so far back...

lso for mechanical, did the entry points on the downtube not cause rub / paint wear?

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Calnago
Posts: 5302
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Really no way to avoid the housing/headtube rub issue when you had the entry point on the right side and connected to the right shifter. You could make the cable really short I suppose but that is not good practice in the event of crash or some scenario where the bars got turned all the way left to the top tube. Good practice would always allow enough cable housing to allow for a full turn of the bars to the top tube without tearing out the cables.

As for the derailleur cables, the best way to route cables on these Treks is to cross them internally allowing for a nice relaxed bend from the shifters to the downtube with not touching of the frame whatsoever. The Treks lend themselves perfectly to this type of routing... I don't know why they don't do as standard fare. You just have to make sure they're not too long or they could interfere with the knees in certain aggressive out of the saddle climbing or sprinting situations. But with appropriate cable lengths allowing just enough length but not too long it works perfectly. And now with the rear brake cable entering the left side of the top tube again, you should be able to route all cables with no frame touching whatsoever. I like it.

by Weenie


darnellrm
Posts: 183
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2009 1:06 pm
Location: NC, USA

by darnellrm

[quote="the best way to route cables on these Treks is to cross them internally allowing for a nice relaxed bend .[/quote]

That's the way I have routed all of my derailleur cables for years. It makes for much smoother housing routing on most frames.

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