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PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm
Posts: 1474
The Crux is not as a racey as a C59/C60. The angles and reach were close though, bottom bracket drop is similar. The biggest difference is probably the longer chain stays. It should be easy to ride one since there are lots of specialized dealers. I just can't emphasize how much fun I've been having on it. There are tons of gravel roads to ride in the pacific northwest.

I think the biggest knock for you might be fitting fenders. There are no eyelets.

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Colnago C59


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:41 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm
Posts: 4749
TonyM wrote:
...I would like to avoid for these reasons all the "endurance" bikes which I believe will be not "race oriented" enough in terms of the geometry. I don't race any more but with so many years and km on race bike, my body seems to be very good used to this.

What would you think about the Specialzed Crux which was just mentioned and should have a similar geometry than the C59?

Yeah, the Crux is not comparable in geometry to the C59 or C60. It is a cross bike first and foremost. Or maybe by "geometry" you are referring mostly to how it will "fit". When talking geometry you have to consider 1) Fit, and 2) Handling characteristics. The geometry of the Crux, while you might fit on it just fine, will have a slacker headtube angle, likely coupled with a greater fork offset. And longer chainstays just because of it's use. Longer chainstays are also more accommodating to disc brakes which is one reason I don't want disc brakes, because the manufacturers like Shimano want frames to have longer chainstays than are traditionally found on fine handling road road frames, but they don't like to talk about those compromises. You originally stated you wanted road bike performance. It that's the case, then you should stick to road bikes. Or settle for the compromises that come with a different type of frame. Of course, there may not be compromises at all if you want to do something other than road riding on it. But for me, I wanted just a nice road bike with fenders. In years past, trying to get a nice non-custom built road bike that would accommodate full fenders for wet weather road riding was next to impossible, but these days one benefit of manufacturers making frames to fit wideass tires is that you can often fit fenders on them, which I like. I wouldn't even consider 30mm tires on a nice road bike, but if the frame has clearance for big tires, then it probably has good clearance for a set of 25mm tires and full fenders as well. I wouldn't worry too much about whether or not the frame has eyelets for fenders as you can generally find other means to attach them very securely to the frame. Look at the previous links I provided to my Emonda to see how I made use of zip ties. Super light, and super clean.

_________________
Colnago C60 - PR99
C59 Five Years Later
My Special Colnago EPQ
Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR


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Posted: Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:41 pm 


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2017 9:00 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 6:58 pm
Posts: 256
Location: Wet coast, Canada
Welcome! I live just south of you in White Rock. This past winter was exceptional by recent standards. The snowfalls we had at the start of each month from Dec-Mar really contributed to the messy roads. There is much more sand and dirt on the shoulders than most years, and at least down in my neck of the woods there has been little street sweeping. Honestly, this stretch from Oct 2016 to now has been the worst since I moved here in 1999. At least Oct and Nov were warm rain.

IMO, what you really need here is your dry day princess bike, which you have covered with your C60 (I have one as well :D ). Then you need a dedicated winter bike with full fenders and flaps, just as Calnago describes. All other bikes are then just variants of these two primary bikes, "the dry day winter bike", "the travel bike", "the old race bike I won't get rid of", etc, etc. The trick is not to cheap out on the winter bike. You are going to ride it A LOT in this climate, so you want it to be something you enjoy riding. You have to accept that it won't be light, the fenders kill that buzz. My personal winter bike is a Hampsten Cycles Crema that I had built in 2011. It is steel, with a steel fork, long reach brakes and clearance for full fenders and 28 mm tires. Built with a mix of 10spd Dura-Ace/Ultegra. I've put over 30K km on this bike and I love it but this past winter has cracked me with respect to the dirty roads and brake pad/rim wear. I'm now planning a disc brake version of a winter bike for this autumn. Looking at options like the Domane, the Niner RDO RLT, but honestly I will likely be going with a custom Breadwinner B-road out of Portland. With disc brakes I can use a full carbon clincher if I want to, and not feel guilty about about killing braking surfaces. For me, I'm not too concerned about matching ride/geometry to my other bikes, I want good fender clearance and easy fender mounting as my priority. As long as the geometry is close I can get my position sorted out. The Hampsten will likely have its fenders removed and become a "gravel bike" or a "dry day winter bike".

Just be sure if you are building a dedicated rain bike to use with full fenders that you are not compromising on the fender mounting. A bike with proper mounting will require much less fender maintenance (the worst maintenance of all!) and give enough clearance to run some larger tires.

EDIT: Just caught the part about you living in Maple Ridge. You live in a great place for riding, some of my fave roads in the whole area are from MR over towards Mission and into the Hatzic area. So many options, up and down, and relatively quiet though a lot of hillbillies in big trucks in spots (Dewdney Trunk). Honestly, the roads are not normally this horrible, this past winter was awful. Hope you are out riding as I type, I am stuck at work reading WW on lunch break.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 5:09 am 
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Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:40 pm
Posts: 582
If I were you I'd get a specialized diverge. Clearance for big tires: check, disc brakes: check, clearance for proper fenders: check.
If you are into steel, vanilla workshop has disc bikes for you, but the diverge would be lighter and better imho for the money. Also offered as a frameset, so you can build it up from scratch.

Post I just found: http://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic ... -mudguards
30mm tires + fenders. Yummy!


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 6:10 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm
Posts: 815
Thanks for all your replies and comments! it helps a lot!

@ Calnago:
Yes I definitely want a race road bike for the winter/ rainy days. No compromises. 100% road bike. I do anyway only bike on roads with this bike (occasionally I take my MTB but I do really prefer road biking). Tires should be 23/25 or 27/25mm. CX is not for me. And I don't need "shock absorbing" road frames, like in the Trek Domane. The Trek Emonda would be fine as it accommodates fenders also but the Emonda frames don't accommodate disc brakes. Maybe for the 2018 models? together with the new DA 9170.
About the chainstay length? I think I read somewhere that Shimano recommends a minimum chainstay length of 415mm. The C60 in my size (48S) has 402 mm, the Trek Emonda in 47cm has 410mm and the Tarmac in 49 cm has 405 mm. Specialized has to make this strange "SCS" system for their disc brake frame sin order to maintain their regular chainstay. That complicates everything for the choice of wheels however. I am not sure about the C60 disc if the chainstay length is the same as for the non disc frames? Do you have any info on that?

@ Bigger Gear:
Everybody is indeed saying the same over here. Crazy winter with snow this year. I suppose you are right with the dirt and sand because of the snow. Really nasty. I try not to have too many bikes actually so that's fully ok. I know with the fenders it will not be super light but my C60 is also not super light and my old Colnago Dream is quite heavy compared to newer bikes. So having a nice carbon frame with DA Di2/ eTap and disc brakes and fenders should still be less than my current and still acceptable compared to my C60. I don't want to go "back" to my old days with steel, Titanium or aluminum actually. Too heavy (stell), to soft (titanium) or too uncomfortable (aluminum). That's why I would like to have a nice carbon frame. With DA Di2/ eTap, disc brakes and a nice carbon wheelset it is not going to be cheap but my single hobby in CDN is now biking and life is too short to have crappy bikes...ha ha..I prefer to have less bikes but really good one. I ride in the winter 23/25 or 25/25 mm tires and I was very fine last winter here. I will keep that dimension and don't need to go bigger (I am also only 151 lbs). Yes I avoid the first part of Dewdney trunk because of the trucks also (if I bike the second part of Dewdney Trunk I bike 100th/ 102nd street and then 272th street back to Dewdney Trunk. But if I ride to Harrison Hot Springs or Hope I take my "highway" Lougheed Hwy as I am very fast in Mission. If you see me in the future I have a black C60 with LW Meilenstein or Campa Bora 50 Ultra in bright. And yes I was biking outside today with the sun :) . Tomorrow will be rain again :x And again my 25 y.o. Colnago Dream Aluminum with DA 8 speed :?

@ nemeseri: I indeed also looked at the Diverge but the Diverge seems to be a more comfortable/ heavier version of the Tarmac (and no S-Works version of it). So less race road feeling unfortunately. Otherwise yes I need fenders and disc brakes but tire max 25 is totally fine for me.


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PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2017 6:09 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:43 am
Posts: 89
Litespeed T1SL titanium or the T3. With etap. No rust issues and a lifetime bike.
I clean it with wd40Image

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Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


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PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2017 10:01 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 8:59 pm
Posts: 38
Trek domane slr, with 32 mm tires. Real smooth ride


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PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2017 10:26 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 10:24 am
Posts: 77
i am not sure but i thought i saw pictures of the new cannondale synapse hi-mod at paris-roubaix which could be fitted fenders on them


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