Poor steerer cut - fixing

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Devon
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Location: Oxford, England

by Devon

When I built my bike, I didn't feel comfortable cutting the steerer myself. I took it to a shop to get the job done properly. A few months down the line I go to swap my stem, and am shocked by what I find (see below); the steerer looks to have been cut with a spoon and the compression bolt was completely lose. I have already contacted the shop and am in dealings to get this fixed; however it will be difficult to get in before Christmas due to work/going on holiday etc.

How bad is this damage, and how easy will it be to fix? My worry is that if it is cut again it may be too short.

Image
Last edited by Devon on Mon Dec 09, 2013 11:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
Campagnolo; because it's a bicycle, not a fishing rod.

by Weenie


victorduraace
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Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2011 10:10 pm

by victorduraace

Try even it out with dremel (put fork at 90 degrees) maybe ?
What's that mark lower on the steerer BTW? Clamp force?

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jekyll man
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Location: Pack filler

by jekyll man

Never had much joy with those compression bungs, myself.

Whats it like when its sitting as flush as possible?

Personally i dont think its a shocker; its not like a 5mm slant is it? I'd be more concerned if it was all rough fibres at the cut.
Little filing and some lacquer should do the trick...
Official cafe stop tester

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Devon
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Location: Oxford, England

by Devon

victorduraace wrote:What's that mark lower on the steerer BTW? Clamp force?

I believe so.


jekyll man wrote:Never had much joy with those compression bungs, myself.

Whats it like when its sitting as flush as possible?

It's not a bung it's a unit that screws into an insert. In the photo it is bolted up tight.
Campagnolo; because it's a bicycle, not a fishing rod.

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jekyll man
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by jekyll man

That's a bung. I presume its one of the expanding wedge ones, that never grip and pull out as you take up any play in the headset.

Unless you've got a high spot on your steerer thats not visible, its not sitting flush.

Maybe chamfer the inner edge a little to get it in the last mm or so? Diagnosis over the interweb's a dangerous game ;-)

I suspect the line is where you may have had spacers above the stem, in which case your bung isn't in the best place to work effectively....
Official cafe stop tester

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Devon
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Location: Oxford, England

by Devon

Yes I had a spacer above my old stem, it was done as a temporary measure as my old stem had a tiny stack height and I wanted to leave some leeway for a new stem (very good job I did becuase the new stem is a good 10mm taller!)
Campagnolo; because it's a bicycle, not a fishing rod.

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PinaRene
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 12:08 pm

by PinaRene

Use an old stem to cut the fork ( that is the way I do it and it works perfectly ). If you are afraid to cut it to low , then there is one solution: Use an old stem , put it level on the steerer tube at lowest point and file down with some sandpaper ( or very fine file ) until you are level with the steerer. I did that last time to get just 1mm of the steerer tube and it went well. :smartass:

Sorry for the bad English though. :oops:

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Stolichnaya
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Location: Vienna, AUT

by Stolichnaya

Your shop clearly needs to have and use a few key items:
1) Cutting guide from Park or some other company that holds the fork in place
2) Carbon saw blade from Park or another company
3) Fine files and/or this from Ice Toolz:

http://icetoolzusa.com/index.php?route= ... uct_id=211

-Stoli

Wcl4
Posts: 220
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 4:33 am

by Wcl4

Run a piece of tape around the steer tube to make sure it's level. Use a belt sander and wear a dust mask. It will get the top of the steer tube much more level than a Dremel.

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legs 11
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by legs 11

Devon, just file it flat? Use a stem and scribe a mark where you need it, remove the stem and file it until you're on the line.
It'll be easier than trying to re cut it and shortening the steerer any more than you need to.
A sharp fine file will make light work of that job. 8)
Them plugs do come loose easily IME.
Where are you? If you're in the South and you need someone to do it in a rush I can sort it for you, no problem.
Your kit looks like VC St Raphaele? Portsmouth?
Pedalling Law Student.

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Devon
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Location: Oxford, England

by Devon

I'd rather not say to protect the shops reputation as they have been very good about this whole thing. I have been speaking to the manager today and they have late opening on Thursday so I am taking the bike in then and they have promissed to fix it and I will monitor. They have been very apologettic and quite embarassed by the whole thing.

My main reason for posting here was to guage how bad this is and I wasn't aware if you could file/sand carbon.
Campagnolo; because it's a bicycle, not a fishing rod.

Butcher
Shop Owner
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Joined: Sun Jan 03, 2010 4:58 am

by Butcher

The reason shops have good reputations is because people will not mention the screw up they make. We all screw up. That kind of work should not leave cause it is not a screw up but a 'I don't give a crap'. Obviously it is clearly not up to my standards even if the customer never sees it. I would and if I can, then someday, someone will.

Not all owners do all the work, but they hire the people that do. Sometimes it take some time before the nicest guy/gal is a Butcher and then problem is resolved when they are asked to leave.

Oops, maybe I should have not said that.

Zigmeister
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Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 8:09 pm

by Zigmeister

I personally use an old stem I don't care about as a guide. Clamp it in there and mark a line and use that as a guide for a 22 tooth hack saw blade. That gets it pretty close, then dremel the rest if you want it perfect.

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btompkins0112
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Location: Mississippi

by btompkins0112

I agree with the rest......not a big deal. File/sand it flat and move on.

by Weenie


seve88
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Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:06 pm

by seve88

If you do file then keep it wet as the carbon dust isn't the best thing to inhale.

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