Stem Slamming

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
hzucker
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 5:56 pm

by hzucker

Hey all,

When do I know I am ready to slam my stem? I ride a lot, around 160-200 miles a week and have it about an inch above my headset. I am riding a CAAD10 with DA9000.

At my current position, my elbows are bent at around 90 degrees. Would slamming my stem help me out? or make me uncomfortable?

Thanks,

parsnip
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Mar 17, 2013 8:50 pm

by parsnip

It's hard to tell without knowing the rest of your fit, but just try it out. Go in stages of say 5mm (spacers allowing) or all at once if you're young and flexible, but don't cut the steerer. Then after a few weeks if you're used to it, cut the steerer and save some precious grams. If you're still not satisfied with the drop, try a http://slamthatstem.com/ bearing cover for a bit more.

by Weenie


kevinkalis
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Joined: Tue Aug 03, 2010 6:29 pm

by kevinkalis

Here we go again
K2

Do you suffer more when you train, or cannot train?


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djconnel
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by djconnel

Try it and if you like it keep it. Just don't do it because it "looks pro", because you're not.

I asked a Cannondale booth guy @ ATOC why many pros run such large drops when they have no problem getting aero with less but with more arm bend. The answer, I was told, was because it's more comfortable riding with arms straighter. That was news to me, but I'll take his word for it.

wpccrunner
in the industry
Posts: 354
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2012 8:34 pm
Location: North Carolina

by wpccrunner

go get a fit done. then you should be quite comfy, and as you get more flexible you can lower your stem. a professional (not World Tour rider pro) is 1 of the best investments you can make for you riding. if youre not comfortable youre not going to ride as much as you want to or should. i work at a shop, we have the retul system and so many people love riding more when they get fitted properly.

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Devon
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Location: Oxford, England

by Devon

I recently went the full way with mine; no more back/neck pain, finally a proper position on the bike & much faster/stable/comfortable. Highly recommended that you try it. As said before do it in stages using spacers, and see what feels right. Make sure you ride a suitable amount of distance/elevation with each iteration before making a decision and cutting the steerer though!

Also consider tweaking saddle height and bar adjustments too, it's not as simple as just altering stem height.
Campagnolo; because it's a bicycle, not a fishing rod.

xjbaylor
Posts: 158
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 4:37 pm

by xjbaylor

Now we are recommending changing saddle height in the name of slamming our stem? I cannot imagine a fitter telling someone to slam their stem and then tweak their saddle until they become comfortable.

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Devon
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Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: Oxford, England

by Devon

Well no, I was just saying that the perfect fit isn't achieved from changing stem height alone.
Campagnolo; because it's a bicycle, not a fishing rod.

MarkTwain
Posts: 168
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 10:51 pm

by MarkTwain

Devon wrote:it's not as simple as just altering stem height.

If you have the correct saddle 'x' and 'y', then it's a matter of having enough functional flexibility (as well as not impeding the diaphragm) as to if you can slam the stem.

Why you would then go playing with saddle height...makes no sense.

JN2Wheels
Posts: 219
Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 3:03 am
Location: Maryland

by JN2Wheels

As always, these kind of "fit" threads are useless for specifics, but can have some value in the general.

I've found saddle position to be highly dependent on bar placement. There is no such thing as the correct saddle fit, without taking into account the bar position. I think of it this way. Adjust things to keep the body's center of gravity constant. If bars go down (and hence reach goes out by a few mm), saddle mavens back by those same few mm, and maybe down a smidge.

Also, If you're dropping by a centimeter or more, I'd consider one size down on the stem. Typically, lower bars-shorter reach. Higher bars, longer reach. Think of an arc drawn centered on the hips.

Again, just general ways to consider playing with your position in search of the mythical A-Ha!

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Devon
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Location: Oxford, England

by Devon

+1
Campagnolo; because it's a bicycle, not a fishing rod.

5 8 5
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Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 2:36 am
Location: UK

by 5 8 5

Drop it 5mm and check you can ride comfortably in the drops for an extended time.

xjbaylor wrote:Now we are recommending changing saddle height in the name of slamming our stem? I cannot imagine a fitter telling someone to slam their stem and then tweak their saddle until they become comfortable.

MarkTwain wrote:Why you would then go playing with saddle height...makes no sense.

Have to agree. Changing saddle position is OTT. If you change the saddle position as well as the bars and it doesn't feel right you won't know whether it's the bar drop or saddle change or both. It unnecessarily complicates matters.

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Kayrehn
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Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 6:06 pm

by Kayrehn

I just got a new build and after I slammed my stem I had to adjust my seatpost... higher. I find that my feet extend further downwards when I'm in the drops, and sitting a little higher makes me able to straighten out my knee a little more.


Saddle fore/aft position might need adjusting too. I cut down my seatpost setback by 15mm, didn't really move it forward by that much as it used to be nearer to the front of the rails whereas now it sits nicely in the middle. Saddle tilt should be roughly neutral to support body weight, having it go down will put weight on the shoulders.


by Weenie


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