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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:04 am 
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Posts: 136
Do any of you use a car wax polish for the extra protection and gloss for your carbon fiber parts? In particular, any products that you recommend?
I've got the Autoglym Extra Gloss Protection and Super Resin Polish with me - if any of you automobile junkies are aware of their application, please advise. I understand that there may be petroleum distillates which act as resin solvents in car polish solutions that may destroy the part, which is why I'm asking here.

And are there any alternative products which you guys may recommend for this purpose?

Thanks!

P.S.: Yes, I'm aware that a polish adds weight.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:52 am 
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Location: Sydney
Well, it depends what you're trying to do here, improve the gloss or correct scratches or hide them?

A lot of bikes use automotive paint and clear coats, so I don't see why you couldn't use the same products, but I'd be wary of anything that was too abrasive as I doubt the paint is as thick.

I'd use something like Meguiar's ScratchX which is a spot polisher (polish tends to mean abrasive, whilst a glaze tends to be a pure polish without an abrasive), with a slight abrasive. It's designed for hand application and would work to smooth out a scratch and cause it to reflect less light and therefore be less visible.

Once you've corrected the scratches you'd want to protect the clear coat, a polymer sealant would probably work better than a natural carnauba wax. Again, you want a 'wax' which does not have an abrasive in it. That Autoglym protection product probably doesn't have an abrasive in it, whilst the super resin polish does. So be careful with the latter.

Question I'd have is... do you strip the bike when you do this? What are you using to really clean the frame of grime and grit? If the bike isn't super clean, you'd be rubbing fine grit into the frame and scratching it, regardless of what product you're using.


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Posted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:52 am 


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:09 pm 
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Location: Flanders
I use Turtle wax on most of my bikes (carbon and alu). They give a great shine and a protective layer. Not expansive and will be available at most car stores.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:42 pm 
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lincoln > Ah, I think I got the assurance and advice I needed from you. Thanks in abundance. Actually, I was trying to 1) hide the scratches on my saddle, after which, 2) put it back to former gloss. I had already shampooed my saddle with a diluted-dilute automobile shampoo, followed by a rinse, dried it under ambient conditions, and a final light rinse and immediate drying with a cotton cloth to remove the settling dust.

Anyway, I followed your stated sequence: the polish, followed by the gloss coat. And it seems to work fine! I didn't polish too aggressively on the first round in mind of the abrasive threat that you mentioned, but it turned out fine after the worrying creamy white colour of the polish was mostly ad- and absorbed onto my cloth. A little rubbing at the regions of scratches and the scratches were visibly (rather, by virtue of indication, invisibly) removed! Now I'm waiting for the gloss coat to supposedly, dry, then give it another go with the polish + gloss process.

Now, the weight part... on a 0.1g graduation scale, 0.0g was gained! Excellent.

cortinovis > Oh, I'll take mind of the turtle wax for now until the next time I go shopping. Thanks for the recommendation.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:46 pm 
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Sounds good. I doubt you'll ever use all of your Autoglym stuff on a bike... ever! Whatever car polishes and waxes you have around for your car (if you're into that kind of thing) would suffice for more than a lifetime of bikes :)


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 1:51 pm 
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Yes I use carnuba wax 3 or 4 times a year. It lets the bike slice through the wind giving me a decrease 22% in aero drag. And if I rub it on my legs I can get 6% more power.
OK just kidding but I do use it on my bikes. It also makes it very easy to wipe down after rides.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:37 pm 
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Location: Phoenix Arizona
not that it matters, but I use a synthetic wax.

Carnuba's don't last very long at all.

But virtually all painted surfaces are auto product coated, so there you go...

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:45 pm 
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lincoln wrote:
Sounds good. I doubt you'll ever use all of your Autoglym stuff on a bike... ever! Whatever car polishes and waxes you have around for your car (if you're into that kind of thing) would suffice for more than a lifetime of bikes :)


Ha, I don't know about that. Now I'm acting all crazed trying to find any spot where I can polish away at with abandon. :D

Gregorio wrote:
Yes I use carnuba wax 3 or 4 times a year. It lets the bike slice through the wind giving me a decrease 22% in aero drag. And if I rub it on my legs I can get 6% more power.
OK just kidding but I do use it on my bikes. It also makes it very easy to wipe down after rides.


:lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 3:11 pm 
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PezTech wrote:
not that it matters, but I use a synthetic wax.

Carnuba's don't last very long at all.

But virtually all painted surfaces are auto product coated, so there you go...


Totally agree. I can't see a carnuba lasting very long on a bike.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 5:25 pm 
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Location: Hamilton, Canada
I'm using this synthetic stuff, it's not wax, mostly silicone-based polymers. Very shiny and slippy, but lasts long time and road crud just falls off.

http://www.turtlewax.com/main.taf?p=2,1,1,4

They also make it with clay bar, for very fine polishing/cleaning.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:00 pm 
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lincoln wrote:
PezTech wrote:
not that it matters, but I use a synthetic wax.

Carnuba's don't last very long at all.

But virtually all painted surfaces are auto product coated, so there you go...


Totally agree. I can't see a carnuba lasting very long on a bike.


Just what I had in my garage. I doubt it matters all that much since I rarely ride in driving rains. I dont think anything would keep away the sticky mess from arount the water bottle cages.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:15 pm 
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any of you have suggestions for removing or filling in a small pinhole size in clearcoat using wax?


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:50 pm 
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Location: the Netherlands
I recommend meguiars products (old hobby of me is car detailing).
One of the best scratch removers (for small scratches) is Meguiars Scratch X which works perfect (and comes in small packages).
Better avoid too abrasive product as some clearcoat layers aren't as thick as they look.
As Pez said better use synthetic waxes on your bike (much easier to use). I use the professional stuff but the NXT wax is perfect for bikes.

Canuba can give the best protection but has to be used quite often. Trick is to not use strippers in between but build op layer on layer and the protection will be perfect in the end (but imho. pointless on a bike).

Best way to repair pinholes in clearcoat is to fill the spot with clearcoat )by using the end of a de folded paperclip). try to put in a bit to much. After drying sand the spot with a 1500-2000 grain wet sandpaper (carefully!)
after the spot is even use a bit of scratch x and way and the spot will be invisible.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:55 pm 
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thanks sharkman! very useful info. i'm sure many on this forum can use this advice.


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Posted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:55 pm 


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:31 pm 
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Location: the Netherlands
Thanks,

Was looking for a pic of a black C50 full off scratches (owner has the habit of using not enough water in a very sandy environment). It was full off white scratches and looked like a new paintjob was the only solution but after 2.5 hours of polishing it got in a near mint state (used sandpaper and 4 kinds of cleaner from rough to very fine)

Point is you have to be carefull and know what you are doing but as long as the clearcoat isn't through everything can be restored.


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