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 Post subject: favoring right sit bone
PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 31, 2006 6:49 pm
Posts: 428
Hello,
I have been working on my fit, been fitted ect. Now Im more and more noticing that I favor sitting on my right sit bone more, I never remember having this issue. Can some shine some light at why I might be doing so? saddle to high, saddle width, rotating my pelvis? please advice

ps: running a romin expert saddle in 143


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 Post subject: favoring right sit bone
Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:50 pm 


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:59 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 1:29 pm
Posts: 618
Location: UK
I’m no expert but do you have one leg longer than the other? It would result in you rolling your pelvis whilst pedalling and favouring 1 side of the saddle. A shim under your cleat my me in order. Alternatively the saddle may be a little too high so you're "reaching" with one leg

It’s kinda hard to diagnose these things on a forum, but it is cheaper than paying for another bit fit!

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 4:14 am 
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One thing I would encourage you to check is if you feel like you are sitting squarely on the saddle. Sounds a bit common sense maybe, but for years I thought I had a leg length issue... In actuality, a narrow saddle had me falling off slightly to one side, and thinking my other leg was too short to reach the pedal equally. So a wider saddle and lower saddle height solved everything brilliantly for me.

Obviously every case is different, but maybe that will provide some guidance.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 4:52 am 
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Location: New Jersey
I would suggest getting your sit bones measured and making sure your seat is an acceptable width. Also you may have your saddle high but obviously its tough to say online. Try and see if your toes dip down at the bottom of your pedal stroke. Its a good indicator your saddle is high. Is the Romin a new saddle for you?


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 5:07 am 
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
I had the same problem which was caused by a saddle that was too narrow. Resulted in constant lower back pain.
Most Specialized and Trek stores have a pad you sit on that measures sit bone width.
Also once you have determined saddle width, a numbe road bike shops now have saddle test programs, Specialized, Prologo and SMP are some that I know of. You can test a saddle for a few days to see if it works for you, before parting with hard earned cash. Saddles are like shoes, and are a very personal choice. What one person finds comfortable does not work for someone else.

If you have been fitted by an experienced bike fitter, leg length discrepancy should have been picked up.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 9:54 am 
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one other thing just to double check, is that your saddle is lined up straight!

My Specialized Toupe has two parallel lines on the leather, which run from the nose to the back, but which run slightly diagonally along the seat. Makes it a real pain to line up straight.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 10:48 am 
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I favour my left sit bone, quite much actually. I know it's because my legs are different length, but there is really no problem and as long as I don't try forcing myself to sit dead center on the saddle, there is no issue. My body has ofcourse grown accustomed to this over the past 12+ years of riding and there is no point in trying to change this.

Even so, I did actually get some knee problems a while back after switching to a narrower Q-factor, and moving even further to the right of the saddle did seem to help, so to get me back closer to the center of the saddle, I offset the cleats (right shoe all the way out, left shoe all the way in) and added a spacer between left pedal and crankarm.

Perhaps a bit of a hack job, but it got the job done and relieved my pains. I still favour my left sit bone, so that was just to compensate for the slightly too narrow Q-factor really. I now sit as I did with the old wider Q-factor.

I did read somewhere a long time a go, that anyone thinking their legs are perfectly symmetrical in length, is 99,9% sure to be wrong. The body is very much asymmetrical left to right, we just don't notice it as we unconsciously make our own small corrections for it...

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 4:40 pm 
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thank you everyone, Im going to the shop today and will try the 155mm saddle and see how that helps, thx

ps: lets start with that=)


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 2:55 am 
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DMF wrote:
I favour my left sit bone, quite much actually. I know it's because my legs are different length, but there is really no problem and as long as I don't try forcing myself to sit dead center on the saddle, there is no issue. My body has ofcourse grown accustomed to this over the past 12+ years of riding and there is no point in trying to change this.

Even so, I did actually get some knee problems a while back after switching to a narrower Q-factor, and moving even further to the right of the saddle did seem to help, so to get me back closer to the center of the saddle, I offset the cleats (right shoe all the way out, left shoe all the way in) and added a spacer between left pedal and crankarm.

Perhaps a bit of a hack job, but it got the job done and relieved my pains. I still favour my left sit bone, so that was just to compensate for the slightly too narrow Q-factor really. I now sit as I did with the old wider Q-factor.

I did read somewhere a long time a go, that anyone thinking their legs are perfectly symmetrical in length, is 99,9% sure to be wrong. The body is very much asymmetrical left to right, we just don't notice it as we unconsciously make our own small corrections for it...


It seems that we have fairly similar body imbalances from readying this. I had a shorter right leg and as a result my left site bone/saddle area tends to get more sore/irritated/painful. The right side seems to always feel like it's falling off the side or not really up on the saddle. Anyhow, in the last week or so I have started sitting somewhat asymmetrically on the saddle, basically sitting with the saddle further to the left inner thigh than the right. This has improved saddle comfort noticeable so far so I'm interested to see how this progresses.

I know the situation isn't ideal however, it seems to be an improvement comfort wise vs. trying to making myself sit evenly or centered when my body really can't...

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:00 pm 
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I gotta say that I actually stumpled upon myself sitting off-center, by pure chance, some time ago. I had ofcourse been doing it for a very long time but never noticed it earlier. It was just a natural development of sorts... I didn't pay much attention to fit besides saddle height until a few years ago.

But if the body wants to sit off-center, I'm not the one to fight it about it. You can never argue with the body and win... :)

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:56 am 
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Very, very true, the body is going to do exactly what it wants and the more you try to force it to do something else the more unhappy *and painful* it usually becomes

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 Post subject: favoring right sit bone
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 4:20 am 
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So I now think that is my pelvis being rotated that is causing the problem, new TGIF that I notice now is that my left leg pushes forward my foot in the shoe resulting in my cleat needing to be all the way forward, the right side is the opposite, I drop the heel more and looks like I'm farther back? Oh boy,
ow am I going to fix this broken body, lol
Any advice how to correct this?

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 7:29 am 
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I had the exact same issue when I tried riding an SLR saddle (lighter right?).
I rode it for about 6 months before I realized I was basically only using one sit bone due to the width of the saddle being too narrow. Back to the arione it was for me!

The other issues discussed here are all good and relevent, esp the leg length discrepancy - One not mentioned is that certain seatposts (most single bolt bontrager/spec style posts) have the ability to be twisted very slightly from vertical. I am not sure what post you run, but if the saddle was not set up correctly, that could be a cause of your compensation.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:57 pm 
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Location: DC
I have a similar issue where I favor the left sit bone. I'd also have the nose of the saddle brush the inside of my left thigh as I was riding. Even thought the saddle was straight I felt like i was sitting crooked on it. I had a full BG pro fit and I ride a 155 Romin Evo and the fit showed level hips and no leg length discrepancies. The saddle was pointing exactly straight. I went to see the fitter a few times and although I like the guy he wasn't very helpful with resolving the issue. I did some experimenting on my own during rides and ended up shifting the saddle very slightly to the right. I rode a 100 mile century and the small shift to the right seemed to help. I'll have to put in some more miles to confirm this. I'll also have to check the cleats to make sure they are even on both shoes. Maybe adjusting those slightly may help as well.

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Posted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:57 pm 


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