What's the recomanded difference between saddle height and h

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
toosahn
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 9:02 pm

by toosahn

shinyboy wrote:Not really sure how this will help you but -

my saddle height is 81.5cm - handlebars are 16cm lower.


Whoa. That's a crazy drop!

yubbers
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 5:12 am

by yubbers

As other have said, go see a fitter. There's so many variables that come into play.

DO NOT look at pros for your set ups. Unless you're a carbon copy of their measurements and in the best shape of your life, you won't set up like a pro :)

by Weenie


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wath
Posts: 37
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Location: Los Angeles

by wath

It really depends on your riding style. The lower you have the more aerodynamic you will be while the higher you have it the more comfortable you will be (generally). There is no "right" or wrong height, its basically a trade off between speed or comfort.

Or you can just jump on the bandwagon and slam it :mrgreen:

WasFab
Posts: 268
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 1:40 am

by WasFab

SL58 wrote:It is really very simple: take a -17deg. stem and slam it. :lol:

what the 17 degrees stem related with the handlebar drop, can you explain?

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saroadie
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Location: Adelaide

by saroadie

CharlesM wrote:there is no right answer for this.

Go see a fitter


+1.

This is an excellent response to the original post. Listen to the man.

Don't mess around with everyone's arbitrary answers to your question on this. They are surely only trying to help you, but comparing this measurement is totally dependant on the individual and nothing else. GO SEE A FITTER.
"Bite off more than you can chew, then chew like hell." Peter Brock.

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CharlesM
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Location: Phoenix Arizona

by CharlesM

Seriously...

The ONLY other answer would be to find someone with your exact same body measures, flexibility, pedal stroke and personal injury past and age and fitness. And then it would be no better than a coin toss that you will want the same feel and have the same riding style.

Everything else but seeing a qualified fitter is bullsh!t.

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dj97223
Posts: 658
Joined: Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:27 pm

by dj97223

True, but in the meantime, we can all talk about whose "drop" is bigger.
“If you save your breath I feel a man like you can manage it. And if you don't manage it, you'll die. Only slowly, very slowly, old friend.”

shinyboy
Posts: 134
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2010 2:44 pm

by shinyboy

CharlesM wrote:Seriously...

The ONLY other answer would be to find someone with your exact same body measures, flexibility, pedal stroke and personal injury past and age and fitness. And then it would be no better than a coin toss that you will want the same feel and have the same riding style.

Everything else but seeing a qualified fitter is bullsh!t.



Do you really believe sitting on a bike is so complicated that you need to hand over a wad of cash for some bloke to tell you how to do it :lol:

Look at how the people who push road bikes to their limits at the highest level set up their bikes and fit on their bikes. It's pretty consistent.
There is a fairly narrow range of hip angle that allows the glutes to work....road bike position is what it is because it works and any intelligent adult should be able to assimilate this to a position that works for them.

topflightpro
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Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2009 2:35 am

by topflightpro

Pez is correct.

And YES, there is a CORRECT answer for this.

The proper saddle height and position is determined by your leg length.

Your handlebar height then is determined by your hip flexion. Basically, you need to measure how much flexibility you have in your hips and then set the bar to a height that does not force you to exceed that level. Going past your flexibility can lead to pain in your hips and loss of power.

A fitter can give this to you.

Trying to gain the most aero position may result in less power and discomfort, and negating any aero benefit.

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fa63
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Location: Atlanta, GA, US

by fa63

shinyboy wrote:Do you really believe sitting on a bike is so complicated that you need to hand over a wad of cash for some bloke to tell you how to do it :lol:

Look at how the people who push road bikes to their limits at the highest level set up their bikes and fit on their bikes. It's pretty consistent.
There is a fairly narrow range of hip angle that allows the glutes to work....road bike position is what it is because it works and any intelligent adult should be able to assimilate this to a position that works for them.


I have been compiling published information on the fit of pro riders and their bikes for a while now. I just put up the results here:

http://ft-atalay.blogspot.com/2012/03/pro-bike-fit.html

As you can see, there seems to be a decent correlation between rider height vs. saddle height and "reach", but a poor correlation between rider height vs. "stack".

Besides this general observation, I will let everyone draw their own conclusions from this chart.

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btompkins0112
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Location: Mississippi

by btompkins0112

SL58 wrote:It is really very simple: take a -17deg. stem and slam it. :lol:


:thumbup:

WasFab
Posts: 268
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 1:40 am

by WasFab

fa63 wrote:
shinyboy wrote:Do you really believe sitting on a bike is so complicated that you need to hand over a wad of cash for some bloke to tell you how to do it :lol:

Look at how the people who push road bikes to their limits at the highest level set up their bikes and fit on their bikes. It's pretty consistent.
There is a fairly narrow range of hip angle that allows the glutes to work....road bike position is what it is because it works and any intelligent adult should be able to assimilate this to a position that works for them.


I have been compiling published information on the fit of pro riders and their bikes for a while now. I just put up the results here:

http://ft-atalay.blogspot.com/2012/03/pro-bike-fit.html

As you can see, there seems to be a decent correlation between rider height vs. saddle height and "reach", but a poor correlation between rider height vs. "stack".

Besides this general observation, I will let everyone draw their own conclusions from this chart.

what stack exactly stands for?

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fa63
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Location: Atlanta, GA, US

by fa63

If you look below the picture in the blog post (and also read the comments), there is an explanation of what stack means in those figures. But in short, it is an indication of how high the handlebar is.

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CharlesM
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Location: Phoenix Arizona

by CharlesM

fa63 wrote:
shinyboy wrote:Do you really believe sitting on a bike is so complicated that you need to hand over a wad of cash for some bloke to tell you how to do it :lol:

Look at how the people who push road bikes to their limits at the highest level set up their bikes and fit on their bikes. It's pretty consistent.
There is a fairly narrow range of hip angle that allows the glutes to work....road bike position is what it is because it works and any intelligent adult should be able to assimilate this to a position that works for them.


I have been compiling published information on the fit of pro riders and their bikes for a while now. I just put up the results here:

http://ft-atalay.blogspot.com/2012/03/pro-bike-fit.html

As you can see, there seems to be a decent correlation between rider height vs. saddle height and "reach", but a poor correlation between rider height vs. "stack".

Besides this general observation, I will let everyone draw their own conclusions from this chart.





Now if only there was a correlation between the .01% of people with the proper physio to ride professionally and the rest of us...

And then there's all the things you don't see on a chart like cleat placement, saddle tilt etc.


And... the vast majority of pro's use both PT's and exceptionally well qualified fitters.

by Weenie


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fa63
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Location: Atlanta, GA, US

by fa63

Which is precisely why I said in my original post "I will let everyone draw their own conclusions from this chart". :D

In my case (1.83m), I get the following:

- 76.5cm saddle height (vs. 77.5cm indicated)
- 58cm reach (vs. 60.5cm indicated)

So the saddle height doesn't seem too far off, but the reach is. I could try to reason that pros like to ride lower and longer positions than average folks like myself, but I won't. I can also tell you I won't be tweaking my fit any time soon based on what it shown on those charts. So again, use at your own risk :D

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