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PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2013 2:54 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 3:43 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Seattle
plpete wrote:
Once I had all the spokes ready I separated the ones for the front wheel build and began to prep them with a spoke-prep compound. The secret is not to use too much as it will make trueing more difficult and make the nipples hard to turn.
Image
I actually pulled the instruction manual out of the little ziplock baggie that came with my spoke prep and read it. They recommend dipping it, then tapping the spoke against something hard to fling off the excess. Imagine how much you would waste doing it that way! I find it's easy to just dip one spoke in and get a little bit on it, then roll it against a second spoke's threads to evenly coat each thread with just enough of the compound.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2013 1:07 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:39 pm
Posts: 337
Location: DC
That would be very wasteful for sure! What I did was while wearing gloves I would slightly dip the tip of my finger and roll the spoke threads on there. I was able to prep quite a few spokes that way and it looked like I used very little of the compound.

The front wheel is mostly finished and just needs some slight touchups to get the roundness, true and dish perfect. At this point it really takes micro adjustments. The set should come in at exactly 1500 grams.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 6:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:39 pm
Posts: 337
Location: DC
To continue my wheel build adventure... read on :) (Part one is on previous page)

At this point i had bot wheels laced and it was time to start bringing them to tension and work on roundness, truing and dishing the wheel properly. Since the front was much easier I decided to tackle it first. With the wheel in the truing stand I went round and tightened all the nipples until I could see one thread showing. Next I started making small adjustments to make sure the wheel was perfectly round. Since all spokes did not have any significant tension I ended up tightening spokes to achieve a round wheel. Once that was done I went around and added a bit more tension since I still had ways to go in that department. Next step was to check the dish. Front wheel was quite easy as the rim sits right in the middle of the hub. Very little adjustment needed to be made in my case. To move the rim to the right you tighten the nipples for right side spokes and same goes for left. Once the wheel was round and dished properly I began to work on making the wheel true. It wasn't too far off but it did need some work. As i could feel the spokes gain more tension I used the deflection meter to see where I was.

Image

Once I had all the spokes at about 35 on the gauge I was pretty much there. From there on the front wheel just required very small adjustments to maintain the trueness. As the spokes began to gain tension I would stress relieve them by squeezing adjacent spokes together around the wheel. As there was more tension in the wheel I would also lay the wheel flat and with reasonable pressure I would press on the rim while the wheel rested on the hub. This process was done on both sides. I believe that the proper prep, as in greasing the spoke holes and spoke prep allowed the wheel to build without any major issues. The front wheel didn't experience any wind up in the Laser spokes in my case. One or two spokes maybe and only because there was a bit too much spoke prep on the threads. Front wheel done! :)

Rear wheel was next. As you can see in the photo, it is fully de-tensioned and all the spokes were quite loose.

Image

In my research for this build I came across the Wheel Fanatyk blog and to my surprise, my mechanic pointed out an entry that described a technique of building the wheel from right to left. This is the blog:

http://wheelfanatyk.blogspot.com/2009/0 ... -rear.html

It sounded like it made sense and that is what I followed. Work on roundness with only drive side spokes and bring them close to proper tension and then true the wheel with non-drive side spokes and bring them closer to tension. The technique worked quite well but somewhere along the way my dish was very out of wack and proved to be the more difficult part of the build. I ended up having too much tension on the NDS which caused the rim to be off true center. I corrected this by loosening the NDS and maintaining the proper tension on the DS. Kind of glad I made this mistake as it was nothing serious and a good learning experience. I ended up learning the the DS is supposed to have most of the tension while NDS falls into place and maintains proper dish. The trusty deflection meter was very useful once again!

Image

The wheel set without skewers or rim tape came in right at 1500 grams with which I was very happy. I used the trust velox rim tape and threw on an older set of Conti GP4000s tires that I am using for commuting.

Here is the finished product:

Image

Image

Yesterday I took the wheels out on a longer than expected ride to see how the perform and to see if any issues arise. I ended up riding a bit over 60 miles. Did a bit of flat, fast descents and some punchy steep climbs where I would get out of saddle. In all scenarios the wheels performed great. They were quiet. I couldn't hear the rear hub very well. Super quiet. No pinging came from spokes either. Wheels felt very solid and hugs were smooth as buttah! They may not accelerate and hop forward on steep punchy climbs as my DA C24 wheels but they were no slouch! I was quite pleasantly surprised with overall performance. Another thing that made me quite happy was how comfortable the wheels rode. They extra width and what ever else there was made them a pleasure to ride. They will mostly live on my CAAD8 which is quite a stiff bike and can be harsh riding with the wrong wheels. I rode 60+ miles with the new wheel set and did not feel beat up at all! Something I would not want to do with my old Neuvation wheels which made the CAAD8 a bone shaker. Overall I'm very happy with the end product and learning experience. I plan to ride them for about a week or so and then throw them back in the truing stand to check things over. To end this post, here is a shot of the CAAD8 with the new wheels. I think it looks great and it got a few compliments on the first ride :thumbup:

Image

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 5:47 pm 
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Great job plpete! Sounds like your build went quite well. Welcome to the world of custom wheel building! :welcome:

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:31 pm 
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Posts: 165
Hi, my names Ben and I am a wheel building virgin. Phew, now that is out of the way!
So as I said, I have never built wheels and fairly new to cycling in general (3rd year of riding, but 60 pounds lighter!) and would love to build a wheelset this winter for next year.
- I do not race, but find myself on several B+/A group rides in the area which might I add is flatter than a pancake
- I weigh 86kg (190lb.-ish) and 5'10 so I am no hill climber
- Aero trumps weight, even though I know this is WW (50+mm depth wheels)
- Carbon wheels only, clincher or tubular doesn't matter much

Have any suggestions/recommendations for a beginner on a wheelset to build? Would like to keep the price under $1,500


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 1:37 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2011 6:34 am
Posts: 148
Hi Ben,
Welcome to wheel building :welcome:
Also, congratulations on one of the best ways to be a weight weenie, 60 lbs is a great weight loss.

Some thoughts on building wheels:
    1. Read as much as you can. Some suggestions include: All of this wheelbuilding thread, Mike Ts Wheelbuilding Blog, The Bicycle Wheel by Jobst Brandt.
    2. Select the wheel components to align with your requirements & attributes (non-racing, flat, 190lb-ish, etc)
    3. Obtain wheelbuilding tools and wheel components
    4. Build
    5. Enjoy the ride!

Components:
Rims: 50mm carbon seems suitable. For reasonable budget consider Farsports, Bikehubstore/Gigantex, for top end $$$ Enve. Two things to consider: a) Clinchers are less effort to maintain but clincher carbon rims are only just maturing. b) Over 50mm depth can cause issues when cross winds are prevalent.
Spokes: As you rims will be stiff, 20 front radial and 24 rear 2x should be fine. Sapim CX-Ray is a good selection as: popular, no twist problems, strong & reliable. Only down side is they cost more than regular spokes.
Hub: Get a quality & reliable hub. Tune, White Industries, Alchemy, DT Swiss all offer good products. Bikehubstore has a good reputation for budget hubs as well. Select quality/reliability over weight for hubs. Not sure where you reside, but that may influence selection from a spare parts/service perspective.

Tools - There are many opinions regarding the optimum toolset. I suspect there is no right or wrong answer.
About $200 will set you up with the tools below (should last a lifetime):
Truing stand: Range from an old fork in a vice, to a $$$ precision instrument (P&K Lie). I use the $50 Tacx stand.
Dishing: Any cheap one is suggested.
Spoke wrench: Get a good one: Spokey Pro or Unior.
Aero Spoke Holder: Sapim Spoke Holder or similar.
Nipple Driver or an old Phillips screwdriver with two webs ground off.
Parktool Tension Meter.
Grease or oil.
Spoke Lube or Anti-Seize Compound.

Purchasing the wheelset and tools can be easily achieved for under $1500.

Read as much as you can, take your time, have fun.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:34 pm 
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Location: Glermsford, Suffolk U.K
I'll add Miche Primato to the hub mix. Not the lightest but good hubs (and cheap and 11 speed) with good bearings and generally not available in 20H/24H but I have them as I do factory orders. The freehub bodies are stock parts with most Miche dealers. The mail exists for a reason.

Also the Gigantex rims are decent I would use those. Spokes CX-rays or Laser. I would not worry about wind up CX-rays try to wind up laser are more resistant to it than CX-rays (if the spoke holder was not used then CX-ray would be unuseable). Sapim make an excellent spoke key and ideal if alloy nipples are used.

Carbon tubular rim are obviously the best as tubulars tyres are obviously the best.

A gigantex/Miche build will be quite cheap, durable and good to ride. Not point in blowing $1500 on parts if you are not racing and good at it unless you really want to.

Other than that the hubs mentioned DT Swiss e.t.c are all good but thprice you did not mention Royce, probably the best.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 5:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:47 pm
Posts: 1436
Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA
Miche is not common in the USA.

You don't need a dish gauge right off- if you have a decent truing stand you can just turn the wheel around. It'll be obvious.
If you do buy a dish gauge don't get the Park WAG-5. It's not "portable" and it doesn't work with the tire in place like the WAG-4 does. Its the only Park tool that has disappointed me.

I'll second Jobst's book. It's an easy read and covers everything.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 8:01 pm 
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Location: Glermsford, Suffolk U.K
Why would you want to dish a wheel with the tyre in place. Also why does a dishing tool need to be portable. It is not like you need to carry it with you when you are out on a ride. Wheel building is generally a thing that happens in one place unless eric you are an a roving wheel builder, any time any place kind of guy.

Sorry but your post make no sense to me.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 11:39 pm 
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Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA
I often don't remove the tire before truing a wheel.

I thought that the "portable" tool would fold up- that's what it looks like in pictures. Folding would make it easier to store. Basically that's its one advantage, and it doesn't work. (it bolts together).


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 5:43 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 21, 2009 3:58 am
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ImageImage

My 3rd custom build wheels I did myself
DA hubs 32H triple laced to Kinlin 380 with all Race Spokes. The spokes are slightly too long and I use a nipple washer to help a bit. Not ideal but works for me

I check the dish again n again and achieve 100% Tension ratio


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 6:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 10:47 am
Posts: 156
So having built a truing stand and nipple driver pay day is looming and I want to build my first wheel set. I am hoping to build something for my cross bike (boardman CX) which is disc. My plan is Sapim Race spokes and Notubes Iron Cross rims 28 front and 32 rear. I am unsure on hubs but may go for novatech or some kind of shimano.

What do you guys think? A good choice for a first build?

I also want to build up a Aerohead rim to match my powertap wheel for day to day training however the only one I can find to match my existing rim is 20h. I think this might be a bit too flimsy!

I am 80 kilos and hoping to drop 5 more.

Thanks for any help.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 4:54 pm 
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Location: Ruidoso, NM
Would be a little better and lighter to use Race spokes on the side that has higher tension (right in back, left in front), and Laser on the low tension side.

It's a very light rim which makes it less forgiving. Not ideal for a first build unless you have educated yourself and are confident... and take your time.

A 20h Aerohead isn't ideal. What's the rear?

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:43 pm 
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Location: Glermsford, Suffolk U.K
I am the same weight as you and I would not want to ride a 20H areohead on a rear wheels. Flexible springs to mind.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:56 pm 
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Posts: 156
On the aerohead the rear is a 28h so I could just go 28 for the front as well. I can buy the iron cross wheel set prebuilt for about £20 more than the components separately but I am desperate to build up a set of wheels and need some new cross wheels :) Other options at the £ 300 - 350 mark welcomed, I am not adverse to tubs.


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Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:56 pm 


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