Want to try TUBULARS

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
53cxzero
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Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 2:25 am

by 53cxzero

Good day, I wanted to get some basic direction on tubular, wheel sets. My budget was E-bay used set. So age and weight are not so important, I weight 190. Thanks;

istigatrice
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by istigatrice

If you just want to try tubulars have a look at the Kinlin TB25 or TB20 rim (for 25mm+ tubulars), laced 28/32 to some nice hubs and they should be a good platform to give tubular tyres a try on. If you can stretch the budget Ambrosio nemesis rims also have good reviews, 32/32 for those rims.

Otherwise if you wanted something more racy it's hard to go past the chinese carbon tubulars. If you can get them in a 24/28 drilling I think that'll be a better option for your weight compared to 20/24.
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by Weenie


whosatthewheel
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by whosatthewheel

There was a time when tubulars were better than clinchers. These days you buy exceptional clincher tyres, as well as tubeless tyres which match tubulars in performance. The only argument for using tubular tyres in races is that they are safer in the event of a puncture or tyre explosion... basically they will stay glued on the rim and give you a degree of control, rather than jumping off the rim.
In practice, I have never had a tyre jumping off the rim.

The big downside of tubulars is that they are big to carry around as spares and that repairing one is almost as expensive as buying a new one... a smal sub millimeter hole might result in having to bin an expensive tyre or spending a lot of money to have it fixed. You can learn how to repair tubulars, but it's not easy and some can't even be fixed (some Conti and Tufo for instance)

Obviously tubular carbon rims are lighter and more robust than the equivalent clinchers... whereas in the aluminium world there is hardly any difference

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

Light weight carbon tubular rims are the only reason to use tubular now. The nmsw nemesis rim is the other reason as it takes ages to wear out. In fact tubular rims do seem to more miles which is good for wet weather riding but the tyres are the problem. For wet weather use through winter I have to use gator skins sprinters and they are o.k but tubeless tyres are a better proposition.

Tubular tyres do offer a comfort advantage well the good fragile ones do.

They only really make sense if you are building a sub 2kg wheel set with everything fitted.

53cxzero
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Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 2:25 am

by 53cxzero

Thanks all for input. So used carbon tubular wheel sets on e-bay ? so many brands

benjaminm3
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Joined: Mon Jul 17, 2017 10:17 pm

by benjaminm3

I picked up a set of wh-9000 c24 tubulars from craigslist for $750 with brand new tires. You can definitely find used sets cheaper than that.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

As long as you have to wedge the two beads of a clincher, be they tubed or tubeless, in between two relatively narrowly spaced high walls on each side, they will never feel the same as a tubular tire/rim combo imo. The safety aspect of a glued tubular is a no-brainer for sure, but the handling aspect cannot be disputed, particularly in aggressive turns. In straight line performance, this handling aspect probably doesn't really play much of a factor, but when the turns get tight, a tubular just shines above any clincher. I never bother to actually repair a tubular, and only use sealant at the time of a puncture, which in the majority of cases works just fine with no mess as it's all in the fully contained tubular, not all over the rim and tape of a tubeless setup.

I've seen some arguments for clinchers like "well, they work on cars so..." which is pretty funny. You cannot compare clinchers for bicycles to car tires for so many reasons, not the least of which are 1) there are four tires on a car and thus the effects of "leaning" a tire into a turn is not so relevant; 2) car tires are very wide and the beads far apart so the "lightbulb" effect that you get with bicycle tires isn't an issue; 3) The sheer volume of air in a car tire means very low pressures (compared to a bicycle tire), and a large distance between the flanges (walls) of the rim and the road, etc.... they are just not comparable, nuff said.

In the end, you just have to decide for yourself what you can live with and what's important to you. For me, I still put tubulars at the top of my choices. Tubeless is at the other end and holds zero attraction to me for high pressure road applications as the downsides to me outweigh the benefits, which I still have a hard time seeing after seeing the faffabouts roadside, or the ensuing mess of repair back home. At least with a clincher/tube setup, if you replace your tube roadside... that's it, you're done... no more faffing about when you get back home, especially in the event where you had to use a tube to fix a puncture that the sealant wouldn't fix in the tubeless tire. But there's people out there that seem to like them, although I've known a number who've tried them and gone back to regular tire/tube combos. That says something. But to each his own.

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Kayrehn
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by Kayrehn

Bloke comes in asking about what to try for a start with tubular wheels and tires, clincher/tubeless supporters please don't come in and debate merits of each type...

To OP - you are not helping without giving us any clue of what your needs are. Chinese carbon wheels are cheap and you can take a pick of rim depths that you want. I'll advice riding nice supple tires with latex inner tubes to enjoy the experience. Used mainly Vittoria tires through the years so not much experience with comparisons.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Fair enough... and agree that there's not much to go on from the OP's post to make recommendations.

53cxzero
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Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 2:25 am

by 53cxzero

Hello, thanks, for input here is more input; I put together, a Stelbel Rodano frame , with Campy Record, Shamal ultra wheels; C17 new ones ;; Wanted to use 28mm Continental tires 4000's But to tight so I bought new 25mm same tires everything new. SO I noticed how hard the ride was, so I bought some Veloflex 25 mm corsa tires and WHAT a difference the ride was. SO FINDING VELOFLEX is what has me doing some basic research on tubulars, it would be in the spring, as I just spent my mid life FUN crisis money on the bike. I am 54 years old, Robert;

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

well you have just found my statement through your own experience that there is a comfort advantage with tubular when you use the fragile ones like veloflex. if they work for you then get some tubular rims based on the kinlin TB20 or ambrosio nemesis or if you want light and this is weight weenies then get some carbon tubular wheels.

I have a set of 38mm deep carbon tubular wheels with skewers and veoflex tubs that weighs 1900g with a 12-27T cassette fitted. so best of all worlds.

sawyer
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by sawyer

TBH I would not go tubular unless you're willing to spend some cash on light, somewhat aero, carbon tubulars. I would add to that, that I want mine to be from a reputable brand on safety and performance grounds, though some others here are happy with generic Chinese stuff. They aren't all the same of course ... I've owned Gigantex previously and they're perfectly good rims and are used in "reputable" branded products.

Without carbon you don't get the weight and aero benefits... a bit pointless therefore unless you're in deep already with tubulars and putting together an alloy rimmed set for wet weather or something.

So what I'd suggest is looking at the cheaper end of the tub market (FFWD, Vision, Gigantex etc etc.) and looking round for a deal there. If you can't afford that, honestly, my advice is don't bother
----------------------------------------
Stiff, Light, Aero - Pick Three!! :thumbup:

53cxzero
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Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 2:25 am

by 53cxzero

Good day, Thanks that brand, name label direction is very helpful; This winter I can sit watching snow fall, coffee in hand, surfing on net, learning etc. Great;Robert;

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LouisN
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by LouisN

Hi Robert,
If you are sensible to the feeling on the road from Conti to Veloflex, then go for tubulars :thumbup: !!

Where are you from ? As it depends on each market ( EU/UK VS USA) where the good deals will pop.
What's your budget for wheels and tubs ?
At 190 lbs ( Not kg isn't it ;) ? ), I would go for 27 mm tubulars like Vittoria Pave ( more durable), or Veloflex Vlaanderen ( smoother) that is if your frame can take it.

Louis :)

53cxzero
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Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2016 2:25 am

by 53cxzero

Thanks; Louis, I am from Pa. ; budget is 1000.00 my frame will take the 27mm. thanks; Robert

by Weenie


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