The wheelbuilding thread

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
sjc166
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2011 1:17 pm
Location: Perth, W.A

by sjc166

No, got the wheels in Australia. The more i look online for answers, the more i am discovering that i should just measure everything myself instead of relying on other peoples figures.....call it laziness i suppose.

bombertodd
Posts: 441
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:23 am
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by bombertodd

sjc166 wrote:No, got the wheels in Australia. The more i look online for answers, the more i am discovering that i should just measure everything myself instead of relying on other peoples figures.....call it laziness i suppose.



Unfortunately, measuring yourself is going to be the best option.

by Weenie


Milese
Posts: 107
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:04 am

by Milese

I've decided to get a power meter, and think a power tap G3 is best for me, although I'm now torn on deciding on the right wheel build, to allow for use as a training and racing wheel.

I want something that is light but robust enough for using for training during winter.

I dont think I'm very hard on wheels, and my current training wheels are some (Very) cheap Shimano R501s that only have 24 spokes rear. My 'good' wheels (Easton EA90 SLX) are also 24 spokes on the rear, so I see no reason why 24 spokes isn't sufficient for my attempt at an all purpose wheel?

Any advice on what rim to go with would be good, I like the idea of sticking with something similar to the Easton I already have, so 25 or 27mm in black. Pacenti SL23 or H Plus Archetype?

How have others built their PTs into all purpose wheels, and how successful has it been as an all rounder?

Is it just a case of resigning yourself to replacing a lightweight rim more regularly than you otherwise would on a more robust training wheel? Are the hubs themselves quite robust?

I'm 70kgs.

eric
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Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:47 pm
Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA
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by eric

If you get a PT you will want to use it all the time. So it needs to be sturdy like a training wheel. It's not going to be light anyhow as the hub is heavy.

My PT wheel needed to be rebuilt about every 9 months until I got a crank based PM. The rim would crack or too many spokes would break. But this was with an older SL+, which does not have good flange spacing. Supposedly the G3s are better.

I'm 65kg. My PT wheel is 28h and I'd wished that I'd gotten 32h. But like I have posted before I am hard on rear wheels- I do a lot of climbing, lots of steep climbs with low gearing and lots out of the saddle.

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dj97223
Posts: 662
Joined: Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:27 pm

by dj97223

I posted this is the road forum a while ago and got no responses, so I thought I'd try here.

I have some old Reynolds Stratus 46T, circa 2007, with White Industry 16/20 hubs. I love the hubs, but the rear rim has some slight damage (small dent in the brake track from a pothole or something). What options do I have to replace jsut the rims, besides from Reynolds (assuming they still carry them)? Thanks.
“If you save your breath I feel a man like you can manage it. And if you don't manage it, you'll die. Only slowly, very slowly, old friend.”

Milese
Posts: 107
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:04 am

by Milese

Thanks Eric.

I've just been to my LBS and they recommended what seems to be the 'go to' choice of a 32 spoke open pro.

Looking at this calculator, with decent spokes it should come out at about 925g.

http://www.wheelbuilder.com/wheel-weigh ... lator.html

Given that my current rear wheel is about 840g its not too bad, going 24 spoke would only save about 40g and at the moment only the 32 hole hubs are in stock, and they'll do it on the cycle to work scheme, so I think the writing is on the wall!!

bm0p700f
in the industry
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by bm0p700f

I have built with the SL+ a couple of times and both times I am glad I used a stiffer rim liek the archetype as the custimer hubs were 28 spoke or 24. Even with race spoke the 28 spoke wheel showed flex. The open pro is not a stiff rim but at least you are light but even for you I would want to use something stiffer like the archetype or Kinlin XR-300, these rims are not too heavy either.

I would not want to build a power tap 28H on to an open pro for anyone.

eric
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Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:47 pm
Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA
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by eric

I am not a big fan of the open pro. I have a number of them (I think 3) crack around the eyelets. They're also kind of flexy but with 32h that's not so much of an issue.
For narrow rims the XR270 is my choice. It weighs the same but is stiffer, making a stronger wheel.

But the SL23 is roughly the same weight and looks like a good rim. I haven't tried them yet but have built some other wide rims and like them.

plpete
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:39 pm
Location: DC

by plpete

In coming weeks I will be building my very first wheel set. I have built multiple bikes for myself and friends and consider myself a detail oriented and proficient mechanic so I figured a wheel set is right up my alley. I will be doing the build at my LBS with some help of course from a good friend. I'll try to update and post photos of the process as I see many nice wheels built up but never the process itself. I weigh anywhere between 158lbs to 165lbs depending on time of the year. I'm more of a "spinner" and don't mash big gears always. Like climbing and am decent at it. Here is what I am going with:

Rims: H Plus Son Archetypes in matte black. 20f / 24r. (yes, i know the finish will wear off :thumbup: )
Hubs: Novatec A291SB SL (front) & Novatec F489SB SL (rear)
Spokes: Sapim Laser (black)
Nipples: Sapim Brass 12mm

Rims are a very popular choice and probably for a reason. Quality seems to be very high, great looks and of course wide rim for a better tire profile and comfort. The wheel set will be ridden on my stiff CAAD8 so the extra comfort will be greatly appreciated!

Hubs should provide a good geometry for the build. The weight and price is right too. Novatec makes OEM hubs for many other companies and this particular set that I chose to use has been used in many successful builds by individuals and small wheel builders.

Spokes should provide the right combination of weight, strength and compliance. Sapim Lasers are essentially CX-Ray's before they get flattened.

Nipples will be brass and not aluminum. The small penalty in weight is worth the peace of mind since the wheels will be ridden in all kinds of weather including rain. This will prevent the nipples from rusting and possibly fusing to the spokes.

Lacing

Front wheel will be laced radially. This should provide enough stiffness and look good. Most modern wheels are laced this way as well.
Rear wheel will be laced 2X on DS and NDS. This seems to be the most effective lacing from my research. Also, my other two wheel sets had the same type of lacing on 20 spoke rear wheels and I cannot report any problems.

Spoke lengths

I used several on line calculators and below are the numbers I came up with. Since Sapim Laser spokes come in odd lengths I will be ordering the following:

Front wheel (20 radial)

Both sides 283.1mm --- ordering 283mm

Rear wheel (24 2X DS and NDS)

NDS 288.8mm --- ordering 289mm
DS 285.2mm --- ordering 285mm

Hubs are already on their way. Should arrive by end of this week. Photos and weights coming. Any tips and suggestions are welcome!

eric
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Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA
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by eric

Use something to keep the Lasers from winding up. Smooth jaw pliers will work.
I bought a twist-resist.

Or you can overshoot and turn the nipple back. Flag some spokes with tape to see how much they twist.

plpete
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:39 pm
Location: DC

by plpete

Thanks for the tip, eric. I have a set of small pliers that may work for this. I'll keep a close eye for when I'm tightening the spokes.

bombertodd
Posts: 441
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:23 am
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by bombertodd

eric wrote:Use something to keep the Lasers from winding up. Smooth jaw pliers will work.
I bought a twist-resist.

Or you can overshoot and turn the nipple back. Flag some spokes with tape to see how much they twist.


I use a pair RC Car shock shaft pliers to hold the spokes. It works great and the learning curve wasn't too steep.

I have these:
http://www.amainhobbies.com/product_inf ... Qgod4VQA0w

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MajorMantra
Posts: 293
Joined: Mon Nov 02, 2009 8:38 pm

by MajorMantra

Good suggestion, I might try a set of those. My technique so far has been to mark the spokes with a felt tip so I can observe the twist, but it's not a perfect system.

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Zen Cyclery
Shop Owner
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Location: McCall, ID
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by Zen Cyclery

Compensating for twist is something that can be relatively difficult to get perfect. I've been building wheels full time for 5 years now and I still struggle sometimes with compensating perfectly for every spoke.

This is one of the many reasons why proper stress relief is so important!!

by Weenie


plpete
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:39 pm
Location: DC

by plpete

So during my wheel build, how often do you suggest I should stress relieve the wheel in order to aid with the spoke wind up? I guess that that each time the wheel is stress relieved the spokes are able to unwind and creep back into being straight?

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