HOT: Active* forum members generally gain 5% discount at starbike.com store!
Weight Weenies
* FAQ    * Search    * Trending Topics
* Login   * Register
HOME Listings Articles FAQ Contact About




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 296 posts ] 
Go to page Previous  1 ... 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ... 20  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Dec 25, 2013 1:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:55 pm
Posts: 154
Geoff wrote:
...light weight climbers shod with hand-made beauties!


In fact i'm currently waiting for a set of Winiums being built for me with tune Mig/Mags. As soon as they arrive, i'll release a pair of Veloflex Carbons from my tub aging catacombs. Really looking forward to ride'em through the Tramuntana... :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
Posted: Wed Dec 25, 2013 1:15 am 


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 25, 2013 6:02 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2003 2:25 am
Posts: 4438
Location: Canada
Mmmm. Be sure to post pics...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 9:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Nov 02, 2013 10:17 pm
Posts: 101
•I was advised that as I’m 90kg (and even in race fitness will struggle to get below 85kg due to boxing background) 24mm or 25mm tubular tyres would give a better ride quality and actually be faster than 23mm – is this sound advice?

No. Unless that is, you are on cobbles!

•What tubular tyres offer the best combination of performance and puncture resistance? I have Continental GP4000s on my clinchers and find them brilliant for both low rolling resistance and high puncture resistance, but found I punctured a lot with Ultremo ZX HDs, so what tyres (maybe 24mm as above) are generally regarded as the best bet for tubs?

The GP4000 may be bombproof but the ride quality is not very good. The key is to look for a latex inner tube with high TPI (Thread per Inch) count of 320 or more. That offers the best ride quality and resilience. Veloflex Extreme and Carbon series offers a high quality, high thread count 350 TPI core spun casing tire that feels great, rolls fast, responsive and relatively durable even on chip sealed roads. Silk (Seta) are the ultimate for suppleness, but will start rotting and self-destruct if ridden in the rain just once. That's why Egyptian Cotton is widely used today in most all commercial tubulars. For a lower price point, take a look at the Vittoria Corsa CX series in quantity for a discount. After selling their factory to Veloflex and moving to Thailand they had some serious vulcanization issues back in the late 90's. However, that is finally being addressed and I recently got 5600 miles out of a front tire that STILL has not gone flat with usable tread! Again, make sure you buy tubulars with LATEX tubes. Conti's top of the line Competitions use butyl. They do NOT ride as nice and I feel that they are very high priced for the money. Dugast and other boutique tires are great, but cost prohibitive for regular riding. BTW ... I train on what I race. Then there are zero surprises. You'll never go wrong with Veloflex.

•I know there’s an epic thread on here about gluing tubs but before I invest time in reading through that – is it generally the done thing to do it DIY and if you’re relatively copped on how long should it take and is the success rate high?

I've tried them all in various combinations but have found that tires glued with Continental Cement has worked perfectly for decades. Holds great in extreme heat of 127F and extreme cold 30F. Learn to glue. It's a good skill to have. Otherwise, I've been on the TUFO Extreme tape with very good success for the past 4 years with no serious issues; although you'll read the caveats everywhere from the manufactures that there are no guarantees. :shock: Take some time and learn how to do both. You won't regret it and when properly glued ... will be the LAST thing on your mind during those 60 mph descents!

•What do people generally do to prevent the risk of getting stranded while out on tubs? I’ve seen reference to pre-adding sealant, bringing sealant with you in a can, bringing a pre-glued tyre but haven’t really figured out what the best bet is.

The "best bet" is to ALWAYS CARRY A GLUED SPARE in your rear jersey pocket if you don't like hiking back in your 500 buck lightweight carbon soled cycling shoes! Sealant as a prophylactic is a great solution to start with BEFORE you flat out. And you WILL flat out. It is only a matter of time because in the end it is only a tire. We should have thought about injecting liquid latex 30 years ago! Stan's works great and is cheap protection. When you mount a new tire...put it in! And carry a pump and a spare!!!

•There’s also an epic thread on here about repairing tubs – again, what’s the consensus, is this generally the done thing? What should I order to be ready for these repairs?

I've repaired tubulars for decades and a great skill to possess. Using Stan's will reduce that chore to only the really bad flats. Get a Velox kit with a triangulated needle (or go to any sewing shop to buy nice quality ones for very little money) a standard patch kit with ribbon floss works great too if you don't like the kit idea. Go on Youtube to see it all in action. Sheldon Smith always had good advice. The tire MUST be taken off the rim for repair. It takes a little practice, but is a great thing to know in an emergency situation. Don't be afraid to get in there and see how the tire is constructed. Refusal to get educated results in being helpless out in the middle of nowhere. Believe me...it's a great skill to possess and will save you one day from riding home 37 miles on your new $5000 high end carbon rims!

•What should I buy in order to be best prepared for removing glue from the rims and getting it ready for a new tub when needed?

If you use a good glue like Conti DON'T TAKE OFF THE BASE GLUE...just the residual crumbs. It is what you need to keep that tire on the rim and prevent it from rolling off. Ditto for tape. It may not look pretty, but it will save your life. Some residual buildup may be taken off with a metal brush on aluminum rims but for carbon call the manufacturer to find out exactly what they recommend.That being said, I have NEVER rolled a properly glued tire in 360,000 miles for not taking off the base glue. When I first started riding, I witnessed a head injury from a rider who didn't adhere to the basic principles of gluing tubulars. That left an indelible impression upon my mind to get educated.

Best of luck. Tubulars are the way to go. Way safer than clinchers on long fast descents. You'll never blow it off the rim if done correctly. Besides, why would ya want to buy a Ferrari and then put cheap Polyglass tires on it? It just doesn't make any sense ...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 9:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:23 am
Posts: 664
Location: Pack filler
....and here endeth the gospel according to?? :noidea:

So you're saying use latex tubed tubs with Stan's sealant?
As has been pointed out in here somewhere, your latex tube loses pressure through seepage, then the stans bonds it together. What happens next?

Tufo tub tape? No thanks

Just askin' like...

_________________
Official cafe stop tester


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 12:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2003 2:25 am
Posts: 4438
Location: Canada
Each to his own, I guess. Personally, I have only ever used sealant in a tubeless application. For me, tubulars flat so infrequently that it is not worth the hassle. I have been carrying a can of Vittoria Pitstop for many years now, but have never had occasion to use it yet. It is so old that I hope it still works, if I ever need it.

In the end, tubular longevity is very road condition-dependent. The best advice is: if you are in doubt, carry a spare and a full-sized pump. That way, you'll always be 'safe' (other than the old 'double-flat' routine :( ).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 2:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 4:43 pm
Posts: 5064
Location: Wherever there's a mountain beckoning to be climbed
Never mind the old "double-flat' routine, how about the 'spare tire is a different model than the flatted tire and the spare tubular valve is a few mm shorter than on the flatted tire and can't be pumped up without a valve extension but you didn't find that out until you flatted on the road and even low profile rims may not be as low profile as old box rims for which the spare tubular valve is long enough and on which you had previously used the same tire model as the spare' routine?

BTW, I flatted once in the last 40000 km of tubular tire riding, and always carried a pump and glued spare tubular. The moral, properly test your configuration.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 9:21 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:55 pm
Posts: 154
Geoff wrote:
The best advice is: if you are in doubt, carry a spare and a full-sized pump.


+1. With a sealant you can't be really sure it'll fix the defect, so a spare is mandatory anyway. The idea of carrying a full size pump on a modern carbon bike reminds me of Erik Zabel :lol:. I carry a mini pump which allows usage of a CO2, however...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 2:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2003 2:25 am
Posts: 4438
Location: Canada
@Hammertime2, I run a Vittoria 62mm stem adapter on my spare. It'll work for any wheelset, though it might look silly on a shallow rim.

Zabel rules.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 10:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 30, 2013 12:52 am
Posts: 192
Zoro wrote:
fdegrove wrote:
Urban myths and French fairy tales..... :lol:

Ciao, ;)
So I got my Mercury wheel set with Extralite hubs. These are very light for 55mm deep and 25mm wide. They look big and are way stiff being 25mm wide. 1110g/set. I mounted the 25mm FMBs. Compared to the Easton set with Veloflex 22 Record (a great tire around 170g), I'm 20g heavier in front (20mm deeper and 3mm wider) and 150g lighter (same depth, 3mm wider).

When mounting I did try the French fairy tail method and will always use it in the future. The FMBs were lose on the rim with no glue. I glued and mounted them, and immediately I did my best to straighten them and there was the typical slight hop. I then deflated them to about 15 psi and wrapped a nylon cord around them doing a loop every spoke and indenting the tire some 2-3 mm with the cord. I inflated to 130 psi and it was obvious things were very tight. I allowed things to sit overnight. In the morning I removed the cord and, well - it worked! A very well seated hand made tire.

OK - No pics - but a short video of new wheels and tires in action - Mercury Cycling M5 (55mmX25mmwide) and built to 1110g pair. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmufIzKz ... e=youtu.be

Jury is out a bit on 25mm vs. 22mm. This last year the rider has been on RZRs with 22mm Velofex Record, these and some nice Eastons also with Veloflex Record and other wheels with Vittoria Crono CS. While we liked the Vittoria we couldn't seem to keep air in them. The Velofex (170g) have not flatted in 42 races and 2-3 club rides - except in a crash and a 1" hole.

M5s are Glued with the new Conti Carbon cement - 1 tube/tire - very well glued, if not too well glued. FMB Competition CX 25mm silks.

The Mercury rims I feel are significantly stiffer than anything ridden. I wanted Ti and went with CX-Rays - Think these rims would take Ti - maybe sorry I didn't. The FMB 25 silks are nice, but at 260g noticeable over the 170g Veloflex. They do not seat as well as the Veloflex. The RZRs - well he can't race them much (rules) so while very light climbing, next dream climbing set are the ax-lightness SRT 24 with Veloflex Records - for uphill TTs.

Opinion for light rider as in video:
Clibe only - RZR with Veloflex Record (would like to see if ax-lightness prove better).
All Around race - the Mercury M5 25mm - with the 25mm Silk FMBs
TT - Hmmm - Last week "they" just announce no TT bikes for race and no discs and wheels must be 18 medal spokes, so thinking these are also TT wheels. 2nd choice Easton's with Veloflex Record 22.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 10:58 pm 
Offline
Tubbie Guru

Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 2:20 am
Posts: 5773
Location: Belgium
Hi,

Quote:
The "best bet" is to ALWAYS CARRY A GLUED SPARE in your rear jersey pocket if you don't like hiking back in your 500 buck lightweight carbon soled cycling shoes! Sealant as a prophylactic is a great solution to start with BEFORE you flat out. And you WILL flat out. It is only a matter of time because in the end it is only a tire. We should have thought about injecting liquid latex 30 years ago! Stan's works great and is cheap protection. When you mount a new tire...put it in! And carry a pump and a spare!!!


Just have to reply to this....
Do as you like but putting a shot of liquid latex ( no matter what magic formula) is ruining a tubular before even starting.
I'd never do this with any high-end tub (i.e. the ones with at least a latex inner tube in them) as this will also require you to keep the tyre inflated at all times. If not the liquid latex will effectively glue the inner tube together making it nigh impossible to inflate again without ripping it to shreds.
The same thing happens with butyl inner tubes and, god forbid, Tufos sans inner tube.
Not to mention clogged up valves and the fact that it's only going to work for a couple of months, it will always tend to solidify at spots where the wheel is already out of dynamic balance and, after all that all you have left is dead weight.

As said, do as you like but please don't spread it as gospel without mentioning all the caveats first. Thx.

Ciao, ;)

_________________
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 8:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:55 pm
Posts: 154
Geoff wrote:
Mmmm. Be sure to post pics...


Yup. :lol:

Finally received the wheels.

Rear: MAG 170, Corima Winium, 24 CX-Ray 2x, spoke crosses tied and laminated with carbon.
Front: MIG 70, Corima Winium, 20 CX-Ray radial.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Wanted to weigh them, but the batteries in my scale are low... :) Should be ca. 1.050 Gr.
I'll put Veloflex Carbon 23 on them and remove the labels.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 6:29 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2003 2:25 am
Posts: 4438
Location: Canada
Nice!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 9:19 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 8:09 pm
Posts: 976
Location: Aix en Provence
I had the same wheelset in 24/28, I rear rim cracked after about 5000km.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 6:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 6:58 am
Posts: 773
Location: 604
Wow that is very nice. Can you tell us who did the build, specifically the carbon soldering?


Top
 Profile  
 
Posted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 6:05 pm 


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 7:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Nov 02, 2013 10:17 pm
Posts: 101
jekyll man wrote:
....and here endeth the gospel according to?? :noidea:

According to Barsook77 who has logged enough miles to have seen just about everything.

So you're saying use latex tubed tubs with Stan's sealant?

Yep... it works.

As has been pointed out in here somewhere, your latex tube loses pressure through seepage, then the stans bonds it together. What happens next?

Nothing.

Tufo tub tape? No thanks

Personal preference. Glue if ya like. I'm cool with that.

Just askin' like...


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 296 posts ] 
Go to page Previous  1 ... 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ... 20  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

   Similar Topics   Author   Replies   Views   Last post 
There are no new unread posts for this topic. Replacement seatpost for Specialized Transition Expert

in Road

filip102

0

287

Tue Sep 24, 2013 8:13 pm

filip102 View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. SRAM shifters - smooth transition to handlebar?

in Road

n808

7

511

Mon May 19, 2014 1:22 am

bombertodd View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. Intro- WW in the making.

in Introduce Yourself / Gallery - Please use metric weights.

shlammed

7

938

Mon Mar 03, 2014 2:46 pm

shlammed View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. Making the Sid wc XX 29" 2012 lock completely

in MTB

Martin.F

4

698

Sat Aug 03, 2013 2:21 pm

yourdaguy View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. Sram red 2012 brakeset making screeching noises

in Road

Sisbud

6

476

Thu Apr 03, 2014 3:37 am

Qman View the latest post


It is currently Thu Jul 24, 2014 8:05 am

All times are UTC + 1 hour




Advertising   –  FAQ   –  Contact   –  Convert   –  About

© Weight Weenies 2000-2013
hosted by starbike.com


How to get rid of these ads? Just register!


Powered by phpBB