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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 8:15 pm 
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Ok, here's a Trek Emonda SL (size 60) that I actually got last Fall, but didn't build it up till just recently. It was an SL5 to be specific and it came fully built with Shimano 105 and various Bontrager components like stem, wheels, bars, saddle etc. I was originally looking for a road frame that I could put full fenders on and run 25's for our rainy winter climate. I did manage full fenders on my C50 for a season, but that was with 23mm tires max and at that even with carving out various spots in the fenders it was just too tight and all manner of needles and crud would ultimately build up underneath. In my search I also tired a Giant Defy Advanced and Trek Domane. I do not like disks on nice road bike, even for the rain, leave it at that. Plus, mounting fenders around disks has it's own set of issues. I wanted a simple frame with good clearance and road handling. Both the Defy and Domane didn't work at all for me. But in my search I noticed the Trek Emonda seemed to have some pretty good clearance. Hmmm... plus, it's geometry in size 60 was about as close to my Colnago 61 traditional as I could ever hope to find. So, for $2500 I bought the whole bike, with the intent of putting the campy group on it that I had in the garage, bikeless, and selling off the Shimano 105 stuff, except for the brakes (I'll talk about that later).

Now that I've built it up I have to say this is one nice bicycle frame.
Image

Trek Emonda SL Size 60 H2 fit


Frame, fork and hardware
Trek Emonda SL Frameset (excluding rubber cover for duotrap sensor and chaincatcher).....1,222g
Seat mast topper and saddle clamp hardware (comes with frame and necessary.....154
Duotrap S Sensor (including speed and cadence magnets and battery)......24
Trek Campagnolo BB adapter Kit (PartNumber 407383).......20
Fork (Uncut 398g - 5g cut = 393).....393
Fork Compression Plug......28
Headset bearings, compression ring and headset cover......64
Stem spacers (3mm red anodized alloy below stem, 5mm carbon and top cap and bolt above stem)....16
BB cable guide (negligible, threw away stock guide and used my own tubing).....0
Subtotal: 1,921

Groupset (and miscellaneous parts and addons)
Campagnolo Super Record
Rear Derailleur.....158
Front Derailleur (less fixing bolt since K-Edge bolt was used instead).....68
K-Edge Chain Catcher and hardware....14
Rear brake - Dual Pivot.....144
Front brake (Dual Pivot) with Trek Fork bolt.....152
53/39 Ti Crankset 175mm.....602
Ergo Shifters..... 334
Record Chain (cut).....226
Cables and housing actually used on bike.....152
Subtotal: 1,850

Front Wheel
Campy Bora Ultra 35 (2015).....500
Veloflex Carbon 23mm w 30mm valve extension.....258
Skewer.....56
Total Front Wheel Weight:814

Rear Wheel
Campy Bora Ultra 35 (2015).....676
Campy SR Cassette 12/27.....210
Skewer.....64
Veloflex Carbon 23mm w 30mm valve extension.....262
Total Rear Wheel Weight: 1,212
Total weight of wheels, tires, cassette and skewers.....2,026
Weight of wheelset alone (no skewers, cassette or tires) for comparison to other wheelsets.....1,176

Finishing Kit
Handlebars Deda Newton Shallow 44cm (outside to outside).....264
Stem Deda Zero 100 - 130mm (with bolts).....138
Bar Tape Fizik Performance 3mm.....82
Saddle Specialized Romin Pro 143mm.....158
Pedals Dura-Ace Carbon.....250
Water bottle cages/bolts (Arundel Dave-O Oil slick matte).....68
Finishing kit subtotal: 960
Scale rounding errors from rounding up on individual weights ....(27)

Total Build Weight (Actual fully built weight as pictured above).....6,730

Other stuff I ride with…
Garmin Edge 800..... 98
K-Edge Computer mount (XL Pro)..... 36
2 Camelbak waterbottles at 70g each..... 140
Lezyne Road Drive Pump (Medium) and mounting bracket..... 130


I really enjoyed building this bike. I think it's really well designed with really pleasing lines. With lugged frames, be they carbon or alloy, I almost always prefer a more traditional frame with a horizontal, or close to it, top tube etc. But with molded frames, I feel exactly the opposite (apart from tt bikes which I feel should always have a horizontal top tube cuz it's more aero and just looks badass).

All my bikes now sport the Specailzied Romin Pro Saddles. They fit me well. And the geo of the TREK places the seat post almost dab smack in the middle of the rails for me, which I like. I measure my saddle position as follows. I place a hard non bendable flat piece of something (in my case that's a t-shaped cut out from a fine cutting board I had in the kitchen) on top of the saddle from the back to the front. I have a digital level I place on top of that. I measure saddle height from the center of the BB to the bottom edge of that board across the saddle. Depending on the dip in the saddle, there will be some daylight in between but I feel I can get an accurate measure every time this way. In my case with my bikes the seat tubes all follow the line from bottom bracket on up, so I follow that line to the straight edge.
Height: 809mm
Saddle tilt: 2.3 degrees down (in contrast, a for a level seated position with a Selle Italia SLR saddle I set it at 0.0 degrees, dead flat).
Saddle setback: 95mm
So you can see that all these measurements are really specific to the saddle I choose and if I change saddles I go through the whole process again to find my perfect spot. A little tedious but worth it to get this starting point right.
Image

I route the cables such that they cross over through the downtube. This provides a much smoother line and keeps the cables from rubbing the headtube. The downtube is so large that there is no rubbing whatsoever on any tube walls to create noise and the bottom bracket guides provide a very smooth transition upon exiting... oh, and in the pic below I have already changed out the tape from the original build. I originally tried the Fizik 3mm Performance tape, and it is just too rubbery feeling for me. I know some like that feel, but I prefer a more "leathery" feel and hence use a smoother tape but with the Fizik gel underneath it.
Image

Image

Image
The above pic warrants a bit of discussion. The grooves for the cable guide (which is super thin and just fits right in with no screws) are really well done. I opted to use some Teflon tubing which is not the flimsy sheathing that is often used. I stumbled upon this stuff at a little company that makes chemical drip machines (or something like that) and they use it like a builder would use pvc piping in plumbing projects. It's pretty heavy duty and doesn't compress with your fingers and a derailleur cable just glides through it effortlessly. I use a couple pieces long enough to just stick up into the frame, thus protecting the cables from all the road grunge, etc., and, sometimes sticky sports drinks that drip down there.

The DuoTrap S speed and cadence sensor is a really nice touch as well... hides right in the left chainstay picks up both cadence and speed. It's super clean.
Image
I tried all manner of wheels with this, and found that an older Campy Neutron (with the asymmetric spoke pattern) would not clear the sensor. The spokes would not clear it due to 1) being a low profile rim with the non drive side spokes entering the rim at an offset of center) and 2) campy hub with a nice wide bracing angle. That combo just will not work in this setup. Everything else I tried... no problem. Although I am using a very thin rare earth magnet that I glue to the spokes. Here's a pic from below (bike upside down)...
Image

The cable routing throughout this bike is very very nice. One thing that is different than most manufacturers designs is the entry of the rear brake housing in the top tube. It enters from the right (drive) side, whereas on most bikes you will find this entry point on the left side of the top tube. It's done like this to avoid any contact with the shaped top tube. I do prefer the entry on the left side since the housing doesn't rub on the frame. In this case there is no avoiding some brake housing rub on the head tube, but the line through the top tube is clean and smooth. It's a compromise that works functionally and I don't have a problem with at all...
Image
and upon exit...
Image

Ok... I've got tons more I can talk about with this frame, but for now I just want to get this posted. I took it on a long fast group ride on Saturday and shocked most people that I wasn't on one of my Colnagos. I think I'll do a head to head comparison of the two. It's that good, and you can get a small fleet of them for the price of a Colnago. I'll have more to say about that in the future as I really compare the two ride qualities and handling characteristics. I understand Trek has already raised the price of the frame alone by $500 since I got this in October. I got the complete bike because 1) an SL5 was in stock and I didn't care what groupset it had since I would be stripping it anyway, and 2) I like the white simple paint scheme best of all their paint schemes and knew the Campy group would look good against it. Interesting that TREK has since dropped a Campy build from their choices so if you did want to go campy now, you're on your own as it's not a choice in the Project One lineup.

Enjoy and feel free to pepper me with questions and comments. I'm sure you've noticed that I've got the new 2015 Bora Ultra 35 Tubulars on this build (at the moment) and am doing as much a test of these wheels as I am the frame. Ultimately though, this particular bike will have full fenders and be decked out for the worst in weather, short of snow, etc.

Enjoy!

_________________
My Colnago C59
My Special Colnago EPQ
Trek Emonda SL


Last edited by Calnago on Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 8:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2015 7:53 pm
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Sweet ride [THUMBS UP SIGN]


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Posted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 8:38 pm 


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 8:51 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 6:58 pm
Posts: 142
Location: Northamptonshire UK
Very nice! Really classy looking in nice clean white with simple graphics. That's a good final weight too considering its a 60cm frame.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 8:54 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:32 pm
Posts: 75
Now that's a very good looking large Trek ! Wow !
(Never thought I would say these words in one sentence)


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 9:01 pm 
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Yeah, Treks don't get a whole lotta love on this forum, but I've always thought their geometry and fit philosophy was very sound. And the Emonda has really got me interested again now with the less "aero" tubes and doing away with the most silly brake placement for a road bike in history (under the BB).

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My Colnago C59
My Special Colnago EPQ
Trek Emonda SL


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 9:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 2:41 am
Posts: 103
Location: SF Bay Area
That is simply superb!!

Please share a link for the cable housing you used internally. I'm very much interested in that.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 9:10 pm 
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Ok, I'll try to find out exactly what it's called. The place I got it just gave me some and I've been using it ever since but I need to find out where I can get some more myself. I've used it on my Colnagos as well since the under bottom bracket cable guide is less than perfect on those bikes.

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My Colnago C59
My Special Colnago EPQ
Trek Emonda SL


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:12 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 6:58 pm
Posts: 142
Location: Northamptonshire UK
nlouthan wrote:
That is simply superb!!

Please share a link for the cable housing you used internally. I'm very much interested in that.


I too would be very interested to know where to get some


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 6:07 pm
Posts: 912
Location: The Lone Star State
I'm obviously a Trek fan, but I must say that this is a SPECTACULAR build. I'm not at all surprised at the frame weight, given that it's the SL and not the SLR frame, but I must say you did a very good job.

Thanks for posting the photos, too. I ride the same geometry as this bike, and I was concerned that it might look ungainly, as I didn't like the way the previous generation Madones looked in the larger sizes. I'm glad that Trek worked on the aesthetics some, to make the bike look good in this size.

One question I have for you is why you chose to go with the K-Edge chain catcher versus the integrated Bontrager unit. I opted to keep the stock unit on both my Madone and Crockett, as well as my wife's Domane. I'm interested to hear your take on it.

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Trek Crockett, Madone, Superfly, SpeedConcept & Cobia


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:41 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 12, 2014 5:52 am
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Very nicely done!

I'd definitely like to find out more about that teflon tubing. Seems like a very good solution I'd like to try on my Emonda.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 11:28 pm 
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@FIJIGabe: When I bought it, it DID look ungainly. The bars were super shallow and wide and not a shape I like. The shimano 105 levers were mounted high and pointed towards the sky. It was hideous (I exaggerate). But I knew I could make it work from the geometry. The bars I chose are very classic shape, and even though they say "Shallow" on them they are a full centimeter deeper than the Bontrager bars that came with it (135mm for the Dedas vs 125mm for the Bontragers). It had a 110mm stem and I take a 130. I knew I would be able to get EXACTLY the same fit position as I have on my Colnagos (61 Traditional), from saddle height/setback to reach and saddle to bar drop. The saddle to bar drop on this bike as shown is 79mm. On my Colnagos it is 89mm, so there is quite a difference at this point, but if I wanted to I could pull out the bling red 3mm spacer and change the top cap for a shallower 7mm one and get to the exact same position as on my colnagos. For now, I'm leaving it here as I intend for this ultimately to be a foul weather bike, albeit a very nice one. It turned out so nice that I am totally doing a head to head comparison with my Colnagos as far as ride characterisitcs go. One of the main reasons I wanted to try this frame was also because of the quite different front end geometry philosophies that the two companies take.

For instance:
The effective top tubes of the Trek and my Colnago are exactly the same at 586mm.
The seat tube angles are the same (72.8 for the Trek and 72.75 for the colnago).
Bottom bracket drop of 68mm for the Trek is slightly higher than the colnagos.
But the front end is what I really wanted to see if I could tell the difference on. The Colnagos are known for the very smooth stable rides. The head tube is slacker than the Trek and the Fork offset is pretty standard at 43mm. It gives a nice trail. The Trek on the other hand, with it's steeper headtube uses a fork offset of only 40mm which is one of the shallowest offsets on a road bike out there at the moment that I'm aware of. They may both arrive at a very similar trail but get there in different ways. I've always been curious as to how these different geometries translate to real riding experience. I expect the TREK to be a little quicker handling, while the Colnago to be smoother. Not that one is better than the other, just different.
I'm a big guy at 200lbs and 6'1" so I'm a good test mule. The wheelbase on my colnagos is 1015mm, while the Trek is exactly 14mm shorter at 1001mm. It makes a difference. I am having a great time testing them out at the moment.
The other thing that will make this comparison very fair, is that the two setups are exactly the same and in my size and built for me by me. That means I am very familiar with the handling characteristics of my current bikes and the Trek is built exactly the same way... same saddle, same height, same set back, same bar shape, same saddle to bar reach, same bar tape. In fact, as I jump on it, I would not know which one is which from sitting on it. I have to ride it. I'm still getting to know the bike. On my first ride I thought, holy crap... this is fantastic and fraction of the price of my colnagos and it looks good too. There are zero rattles, zero noise, zero misshfits... setup is perfect right now. So what I am testing is really a test of the two frames and not a perceived difference.
I really think magazine reviews are a poor test bed for comparison because unless exactly the same setups from bike to bike are used, there are just too many things that could be contributing to differences in feel. Plus, magazine reviews are always watered down or worded maybe not favorably, but rarely negatively, since no one wants to piss off a paying advertiser.

Off for a ride on the C59 right now... to compare once again.

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My Colnago C59
My Special Colnago EPQ
Trek Emonda SL


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 11:49 pm 
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@Fijigabe: Forgot to answer about the chaincatcher question. The chaincatcher that comes with the bike is a little piece of plastic that wouldn't seem to do much imo except prevent the chain from getting jammed between the crank and the bottom bracket. But it seemed to me that the chain could still come off under certain conditions. I may be wrong about that, but the new K-edge chain catchers, with the independent adjustment from the derailleur mounting bolt itself, are superb. Properly adjusted, I don't think there's any way the chain can get between the small ring and the chain catcher. I also run a standard crank. The crank came with this bike was a compact. In hindsight I should have tested how the stock chain catcher actually performed, but I didn't like it and just couldn't be bothered. Maybe when I have the crank off doing some maintenance I'll put it back on just to see what the implications would be with my current setup.

_________________
My Colnago C59
My Special Colnago EPQ
Trek Emonda SL


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 1:27 am 
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Location: The Lone Star State
Thanks for the reply and comparison. You have a far knowledge of bike fit than I do. I am, however, very intrigued by your findings, and I'm looking forward to your comparison. We ride on identical geometry bikes, and other than some fine-tuning, we could probably exchange bikes (shorter stem/higher saddle for me).

As for the chain catcher, I can confirm that it isn't there to keep the chain from falling off, only keep it from hitting and damaging the frame, and does a fine job at that. I haven't tried the new generation K-Edge chain catchers. I have two of the previous generation units, without the adjuster, so I opted to go with the Trek catcher.

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Trek Crockett, Madone, Superfly, SpeedConcept & Cobia


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 2:24 am 
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The older K-Edge chain catchers work perfectly fine as well, they are just harder to get adjusted since the same bolt holds both the derailleur and the chain catcher so you have to keep them both in place simultaneously as you tighten the bolt. The new ones are much more "install friendly".

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My Colnago C59
My Special Colnago EPQ
Trek Emonda SL


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 2:51 am 
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Yeah, that's what I noticed about them. I'm not currently using one on my TT bike, although previously, I had the K-Edge (when I went to Ultegra 11-speed, I chose to leave it off).

Regarding your choice of cable liner, did you do something to secure the liner inside the frame? My Madone didn't come with an internal liner, although my wife's Domane did. Last time I recabled my Madone, it took me the better part of an hour to fish the three cables through (front and rear derailleurs, and the BB mounted brake cable). If your solution is in someway permanent, I would be very intrigued to see how you did it, so I can make similar lines for my bike.

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Trek Crockett, Madone, Superfly, SpeedConcept & Cobia


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Posted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 2:51 am 


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