Dengfu FM098 – 2017 Build

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mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

dudemanppl wrote:A CAAD 10 would ride nicer and they're only 350 bucks though? Plus you won't get ridiculed on WW.


I agree that Cannondales ride nicely. I have a SuperSix Evo and love how it handles. I wanted something different, and I wanted to go through the process of making the hundreds of decisions of choosing every aspect of my own bike. I also enjoy the process of assembling it from the ground up, and understanding the mechanics of every part so that I can fine-tune and maintain it on my own. I had a pro fit done when I purchased my Cannondale, so I started this bike by just matching the geometry as close as possible. I don't know why steerer tube spacers are such a trigger for the cyber bullies on this site, but we are not all twenty year old class one racers that can tolerate a slammed stem for hours at a time. That doesn't make me undeserving of pro-level components if I chose to purchase them, or an aero-style frame if I like that look. I'll accept that part of the aero look is having minimal spacers, but once you make the cut, you are stuck with it, so I am going to take it slow. I'll make that decision based on body angles, handling, and CG, not some right-of-passage ridicule.

m66
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue May 28, 2013 3:28 am

by m66

Ok so the rear is 727g? The Ed rear hub is listed as 200g, and say 120g for spokes/nipples; that would make the rim 407g. That's pretty damn light for a 38mm clincher, but let's say that's correct. So the front rim is the same, so 407g plus 100g spokes and 60g Ed front hub = 567.


mikedkelly wrote:
m66 wrote:
Farsports 38mm x 20.5mm carbon front wheel 468g


Is this correct? Seems too light for a clincher..what hubs are you running?


Yes, it is surprisingly correct. They are unusually light with the wheelset coming in at 1200g. The hubs are EDHub. I'm guessing that they are able to get to that weight though a combination of the narrow profile, the lighter hubs, and a minimal layup, which requires a 90kg weight limit on the bike. They also make a UCI certified version, which is 23mm wide with DT Swiss hubs. I was nervous about structural integrity and braking temperatures, but there is a pretty sizable thread on this site with good reports on the wheels. I've also found the braking surface to be barely luke-warm after several minutes of heavy downhill braking.

by Weenie


mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

m66 wrote:Ok so the rear is 727g? The Ed rear hub is listed as 200g, and say 120g for spokes/nipples; that would make the rim 407g. That's pretty damn light for a 38mm clincher, but let's say that's correct. So the front rim is the same, so 407g plus 100g spokes and 60g Ed front hub = 567.


Remember, the rear wheel weight also includes an 11sp Shimano free hub. I'd weigh it again and include a photo, but the tire and veloplugs took quite a lot of effort to get on, so I'm not prepared to disassemble it. Here is the link to the wheelset, and another to the discussion here on WW. I got the idea from this thread, which is another FM098 with the same wheelset. He doesn't break out his weights by wheel, but is getting a similar total weight.
Last edited by mikedkelly on Sun Apr 30, 2017 6:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

thedonnydino
Posts: 84
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2016 11:10 pm

by thedonnydino

IMO, the effort into the paint and custom livery is offset by the number of spacers underneath the stem.

Fortunately though, it appears that the spacers are there to accommodate the strange integrated stem/bar combo that has ridiculous proportions.

I would opt for a regular stem and compact bar combo, and get rid of some of those spacers. That way you will have both an aesthetically pleasing bike and have something that is quite comfortable as well.

mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

Stolichnaya wrote:Mike, the issue everyone is commenting on is the general position - it indicates that the frame is not right for your riding position. Fortunately, it appears to be only the bar choice. The frame's top tube would allow for a stem that rises slightly without looking awkward. The bars you have chosen also appear to have a long reach and deep drop. From your comments, this integrated combo is the opposite of what you need. I would recommend a stem that has some significant stack and a slight rise that mimics the top tube slope and then some compact bars. You would reduce some spacers and potentially stiffen up the front end. Some bars with raised hoods might also help here. Something like the FSA K-Wing Compact.


Thanks. I'm always open to constructive criticism. Learning the details of a pro fit is something I am looking forward to adding to my list. It sounds like I need to start with my saddle and ensure it is in the correct horizontal position first, then move forward and work with the bars. The reach from the BB to the steerer tube is close, but as you said, the bars themselves are throwing the rest out of whack, requiring a higher stack. I'll probably put the spacers on top of the stem to lower it without cutting the tube as a test to see how it feels for a few rides, then make a final cut once I am sure. No pictures of that setup though as I am sure it would bring the fire. :lol:

m66
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue May 28, 2013 3:28 am

by m66

According to your link, the rims are 390g, the spokes are 4.8g, and the front hub is 65g. That makes the front wheel 550g.

The rear calculates out to 697, total for the set 1247...

If you actually weighed the from wheel at 468, i'd be pretty concerned, because a 307g rim that is designed to weigh 390g must have an awful lot of those "thin spots" that show up in the second link you provided...

I'm not trying to give you a hard time, I just happen to be looking for a lightweight set of carbon clinchers myself, thinking about the new Schmolke 45 clinchers, which come in right around 400g, which is about the lowest weight i've seen for a wide aero 45....

m66 wrote:Ok so the rear is 727g? The Ed rear hub is listed as 200g, and say 120g for spokes/nipples; that would make the rim 407g. That's pretty damn light for a 38mm clincher, but let's say that's correct. So the front rim is the same, so 407g plus 100g spokes and 60g Ed front hub = 567.


mikedkelly wrote:
m66 wrote:
Farsports 38mm x 20.5mm carbon front wheel 468g


Is this correct? Seems too light for a clincher..what hubs are you running?


Yes, it is surprisingly correct. They are unusually light with the wheelset coming in at 1200g. The hubs are EDHub. I'm guessing that they are able to get to that weight though a combination of the narrow profile, the lighter hubs, and a minimal layup, which requires a 90kg weight limit on the bike. They also make a UCI certified version, which is 23mm wide with DT Swiss hubs. I was nervous about structural integrity and braking temperatures, but there is a pretty sizable thread on this site with good reports on the wheels. I've also found the braking surface to be barely luke-warm after several minutes of heavy downhill braking.

mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

m66 wrote:If you actually weighed the front wheel at 468, i'd be pretty concerned, because a 307g rim that is designed to weigh 390g must have an awful lot of those "thin spots" that show up in the second link you provided...

I'm not trying to give you a hard time, I just happen to be looking for a lightweight set of carbon clinchers myself, thinking about the new Schmolke 45 clinchers, which come in right around 400g, which is about the lowest weight i've seen for a wide aero 45....

My posted weight could certainly be in error. I was surprised that the set came in 55g under their advertised weight. I'm traveling this week, but I can weigh the assembled wheel again and subtract out the tire and tube weight. They only advertise this weight on their 20.5mm wide rims. It restricts you to a maximum tire width of 25mm, which is getting out of trend for some. The norm now is a 23mm wide rim, which lets you use up to 28mm tires and removes the "lightbulb" shape between the wheel and rim of the older 20.5s. But it puts you back to the 1400g range for wheelset weight, as does their UCI certified wheels.

mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

thedonnydino wrote:IMO, the effort into the paint and custom livery is offset by the number of spacers underneath the stem.

Fortunately though, it appears that the spacers are there to accommodate the strange integrated stem/bar combo that has ridiculous proportions.

I would opt for a regular stem and compact bar combo, and get rid of some of those spacers. That way you will have both an aesthetically pleasing bike and have something that is quite comfortable as well.


Thanks, it may come to that. I'm going to drop the bars down and see how it feels. There are plenty of light alloy stems and bars that would work in its place.

mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

Here it is after working thorough the fit and lowering the stem.
Image

mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

mikedkelly wrote:If you actually weighed the front wheel at 468, i'd be pretty concerned, because a 307g rim that is designed to weigh 390g must have an awful lot of those "thin spots" that show up in the second link you provided...


You were correct, it looks like the front wheel weight is actually 574g. I also shaved off some weight by lowering the stem. The chart on the OP shows the corrected weights now.

itguy
Posts: 129
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2015 3:43 pm

by itguy

What's your feedback for the wheels?

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

itguy wrote:What's your feedback for the wheels?


They are my first set of carbon wheels, but being 800g lighter than my alloy wheels, they spin up noticeably faster and feel quick on the climbs as they mathematically should. They arrived perfectly true and remain so after the first 100 miles. My daily ride involves a long and hard brake to a full stop on a 10% grade. I have felt the rims several times as soon as I stop and they are barely luke warm. I was concerned that having velo plugs with carbon clinchers could cause a heat problem, but it looks like the modern basalt resins that they use on the braking surface dissipate the heat just fine. I am very pleased with them so far.

rkorpu
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu May 04, 2017 4:42 pm

by rkorpu

Hi, I am new to the cycling scene. I own a Specialized Tarmac with Shimano Tiagra and have around 500 miles on it. I am interested in building a bike on my own and stumbled upon the open build threads. Your setup looks amazing. How much did it set you back in terms of money?

chefczyk
Posts: 49
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2017 10:20 pm

by chefczyk

Nice looking build!

mikedkelly
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:17 pm

by mikedkelly

rkorpu wrote:Hi, I am new to the cycling scene. I own a Specialized Tarmac with Shimano Tiagra and have around 500 miles on it. I am interested in building a bike on my own and stumbled upon the open build threads. Your setup looks amazing. How much did it set you back in terms of money?

Hi there. I bought the frame, saddle, handlebars, bottle cages, and headset from DengFu for $800 including paint and shipping to the US. The wheels from Farsports were $645 including shipping. After that, the remaining cost is a matter of choosing your components. One solution would be to put your Tiagra components on the new frame. Just make sure you have the same bottom bracket and freehub setup. Otherwise, you can get new or used components at a range of prices. One other thing to consider is all of the tools you will need. I wanted to do everything myself, which required several hundred dollars worth of new tools. If you have a local bike shop that is willing to work on your unbranded bike, I would have them install your bottom bracket and align your derailleur hanger. That will save you quite a bit on tools that you will only use once, although there are DIY solutions for those tools if you want to go that route. There are lots of decisions to make, but that was part of what made the process fun for me. Good luck and let me know if I can answer any more questions. I can point you to a bunch of blogs and videos that answer specifics.

by Weenie


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